Upcoming Concerts

Linda Bento-Rei

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  • Principal Flute, Venice Symphony Orchestra (VSO), Venice, FL
  • Artistic Director, Sarasota Musica Viva, Sarasota, FL

After a number of decades of performing in many of New England’s most notable symphony orchestras as soloist and section member, performing in and directing various chamber music groups and concert series, serving as educator and mentor for many now accomplished flutists, conducting chamber music master classes and directing flute choirs, Linda Bento-Rei’s versatility and passion for fresh and diverse projects has lead her to record her first album entitled “The Jongen Project” which contains the music of Belgian composer, organist and educator, Joseph Jongen (1873-1953). Following a series of acclaimed chamber music concerts which included Jongen’s, “Concert a Cinq” with the principal string players and retired principal harpist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Bento-Rei was inspired to record Jongen’s relatively unknown music. A deep passion was born and after researching the composer, a number of pieces which include flute in solo and chamber music settings were unearthed. Her profound connection to Jongen’s music is brilliantly expressed in this extraordinary and masterful recording.

She now frequently performs concerts featuring Jongen’s music in addition to music included on her second CD project entitled “Invocation” which was released in October, 2015. This virtuosic project includes an array of eclectic works from a variety of musical genres and ensembles including a piece with Latin Percussion in the Afro-Cuban style. 

Bento-Rei released her third CD entitled "Noel, Reinvented Holiday Classics" with Boston Symphony pianist, Vytas J. Baksys in November, 2017. All three CDs are available on Amazon.com.

Bento-Rei champions diverse new compositions for flute and premiered a Flute Sonata written for her and pianist, Vytas Baksys in March, 2015. This piece will be included in her fourth recording project called "Endangered Pieces" which began in August, 2016 and will be released in 2018.

Linda Bento-Rei received her bachelor of music degree from the Boston Conservatory of Music, cum laude and her master of music from the New England Conservatory of Music as a merit scholarship recipient. Her primary teachers include Boston Symphony piccoloist, Lois Schaefer and William Grass. She received coaching and master classes from John Heiss, Randy Bowman and Fenwick Smith.

Shortly after moving to Florida in 2014, Bento-Rei co-founded Sarasota Musica Viva with her husband, Stephen Rei. This non-profit chamber music organization serves to present diverse and eclectic collaborative performances throughout the West Coast of Florida utilizing nationally recognized local talent. Bento-Rei serves as the Artistic Director and performer of the organization.

Please visit www.sarasotamusicaviva.org for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Gallery

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CDs & Music Samples

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Please email Linda Bento-Rei at lmbrei@gmail.com to purchase a CD. Also available at Amazon.com.

Past Performances

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Sunday, September 22, 2013 3 PM "The Jongen Project" - POSTPONED TO 1.5.14

Jordan Hall

30 Gainsborough Street

Boston, MA

Thursday, October 3, 2013 8 PM Chamber Music with Ann Pilot

The Brooks Concert Hall

College of The Holy Cross

1 College Street

Worcester, MA

 

Sunday, January 5, 2014 "The Jongen Project"

Brown Hall

30 Gainsborough Street

Boston, MA

 

 

Engagements

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Available for solo and chamber music concerts. Please contact Linda Bento-Rei for booking arrangements. lmbrei@gmail.com

Accolades

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                               "Dear Linda, The Jongen recording is just beautiful. Your playing throughout the CD is just                                 beautiful and a pleasure to listen to. I wish all CD’s were this inspiring." - Sir James Galway
 
                              About the Jongen CD .... "I believe the performance is very elegant, refined into every detail and                              you play it in a beautiful intimate way. It sounds very natural and with a lot of "joie de vivre" "  
                                  -  Robert Waelkens

 

 

  "What a super, super show of physical endurance. Your playing was out of this world" - Eileen Fox

 

     "Just wanted to say congrats on a terrific performance today- very inspiring!!  Glad to be there!" - Sue Almy

 

     "It was a pleasure to work with you and be a part of the project. One doesn't get the chance to play the Jolivet every day and you sounded terrific!" - Miguel Perez-Espejo

 

    "I love watching you play. Every breath, every note. You are incredible"  - Barbara Gokey

 

     "You & Vytas, …. WOW! …. What a perfect duo and great accompanist to perform together. … Congratulations on the new CD!" - Jim Tomasetti

                               

Jordan Hall Concert POSTPONED

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Sunday, September 22, 2013 at 3 PM Postponed to January 5, 2014 at 3 PM at BROWN HALL

New England Conservatory

30 Gainsborough Street

Boston, MA

 

Miguel Perez-Espejo

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Miguel Pérez-Espejo Cárdenas, D.M.A., “a violinist of exceptional ability and a human being of impeccable characterwith an outstanding ability to interpret from the heart” (Aaron Rosand), “…a very strong leader… a fine soloist, with a beautiful tone, impeccable intonation and rhythm… a fine musicianship and artistic sensibility” (Stanislaw Skrowaczewski), is considered as one of the most talented Spanish violinists of his generation, whose performances have been highly praised by critics from The Boston Globe to The Daily Telegraph (U. K.), the chief music critic of which, Mr. Geoffrey Norris, wrote about him: “It was extremely impressive, and I was struck particularly by the Bach Chaconne, which seemed to me to have exceptional maturity and expressive depth”.

A top-prize winner at The Olga Koussevitzky Competition in New York City, he also won the Chautauqua Institution Competition and was a Prize-winner at the Murcia International Violin Competition. He was a Fulbright Scholar from 2000 to 2002, sponsored by the Ministry of Culture of Spain, and has received numerous awards and distinctions, among which stand those of the Theodore Presser Foundation, the SÉNECA Foundation from Spain and the New England Conservatory’s George W. Chadwick Gold Medal. Since November 2006 he is a Member of the prestigiousReal Academia de Bellas Artes Santa María de la Arrixaca (Royal Academy of Fine Arts Santa María de la Arrixaca), of Murcia, Spain, and he has been awarded thePaul Harris Fellow Prize from the Rotary Club Cartagena, the highest distinction of the Rotary Club worldwide. He was invited to join Pi Kappa Lambda, the Honor Music Society of the United States, of which he is a member since May 2009.

As soloist, Dr Pérez-Espejo has concertized widely in Spain, Europe, and the United States, in venues that include the Auditorio Nacional (National Auditorium) and Teatro Monumental in Madrid, the Palau de la Música of Valencia, Baluarte y Centro de Congresos of Pamplona, the Chautauqua Institution Auditorium, as well as the concert halls of Zaragoza and Murcia. He has performed with orchestras such as the Spanish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra (RTVE), Orquesta de Valencia, the Gardner Chamber Orchestra or the Murcia Symphony, and has collaborated with conductors Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Sergiu Commisiona, Adrian Leaper, Douglas Boyd, Gunther Schuller, Carlo Ponti and José Miguel Rodilla, among others. Recent and upcoming performances include world premières of works written for him by two of Spain’s foremost composers: Miguel Franco’s Sinfonía ConcertanteOp. 87, and José Zárate’s Violinesca, both for violin and orchestra, as well as the American première of Zárate’s Canto para violín solo.

Sponsored by institutions such as Banco de Santander, The Rotary Club, Spanish General Consulate, Instituto Cervantes, SÉNECA Foundation, Cajamurcia or Caja de Ahorros del Mediterráneo C.A.M., Pérez-Espejo has offered numerous recitals in cities like Chicago, New York, London, Valencia or Boston, and at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. He has performed in live radio broadcasts for the Spanish National Radio (Radio Nacional de España), Spanish national Television (TVE), and Canal Clásico. Pérez-Espejo co-directed with Antonio Muñoz Molina and performed in the concert series Spain in Chamber Music at the Cervantes Institute in New York City. He has recorded for the RTVE MÚSICA label, among others, releasing the first Spanish recording of the Elgar Violin Concerto (live) as well as the recital CD “Música española para violín y piano”, devoted entirely to Spanish music. He was one of the four violinists invited by the Fundación March of Madrid to perform in the concert cycle Sarasate y otros virtuosos, commemorating the 100th. Anniversary of Sarasate’s death, and directed and performed in the recital cycle El violín hispano at Boston University’s Tsai Performance Center, sponsored by Banco de Santander, Instituto Cervantes and the Department of Romance Languages at Boston University. He has been featured in the newspaper El Mundo and in the music magazine Melómano.

As chamber musician, Pérez-Espejo has performed with international artists Roberto Díaz, Colin Carr, James Dunham, Laurence Lesser, Paula Robison and Chee-Yun, among others, and in venues such as Jordan Hall, Harvard, Northeastern and Boston Universities and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. He has been guest artist in many international festivals in the United States, Canada and Europe, and together with Taiwanese violinist Hsin-Lin Tsai, he was member of the quartet praised as “the outstanding string quartet” by Richard Dyer, chief music critic of The Boston Globe.  He performs in Murcia in theConcierto Extraordinario de Navidad with the Saravasti String Quartet, and concertizes extensively with Hsin-Lin Tsai as the acclaimed L'Étoile violin duo, which has been praised as “extraordinary” by critics and audiences.

Heir to a unique musical background, his teachers include Aaron Rosand, Michèle Auclair, Yuri Mazurkevich, Eric Rosenblith, and Joaquín Palomares, and received special private instruction from the late and distinguished violinist Pina Carmirelli, founder of I Musici. He received his doctoral degree in violin performance from Boston University in May 2009, an wrote his dissertation Pablo Sarasate: the Violinist, the first violinistic study on the Spanish artist. Dr. Pérez-Espejo holds degrees with the highest Honors and Distinctions from the Murcia Superior Conservatory (“Profesor Superior de Violín”, 1997), the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston (B.M. 2000; M.M. 2002), and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London (Artist Diploma, 2003). A passionate pedagogue, Dr. Pérez-Espejo has been invited as faculty to teach master classes in festivals in the U.S. and Spain, and his students have won top prizes in competitions and auditions. In the summer he teaches and serves as Coordinator of Strings at the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. He is currently on the Faculty at Bridgewater State University, where he is a member of the faculty Piano Trio, and performs with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Dr. Pérez-Espejo proudly endorses and collaborates with the Elfenworks Foundation in their philanthropical efforts through music. He resides both in Spain and the United States with his wife, violinist Hsin-Lin Tsai.

Miguel is a performing artist on the "Spring Serenade" CD in Chant de Linos by Andre Jolivet which will be released in 2013/2014.

 

 

Biographies

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Please visit our biographies.

Vytas Baksys

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Pianist Vytas J. Baksys is an active free-lance collaborator performing a variety of recitals, competitions, and other functions of various styles and genres throughout North America, Europe, and Asia. Since 1989 he has been the faculty pianist with the Fellowship Conducting Program at Tanglewood, a frequent keyboardist with the Boston Symphony and Boston Pops orchestras, and works with other area ensembles such as the Concord Chamber Music Society, The Rivers School Conservatory, Boston Musica Viva, Boston Secession, and the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Of Lithuanian descent, Vytas is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music and State University of New York at Stony Brook. His principal teachers include Angel Ramon Rivera, Victor Rosenbaum, and Gilbert Kalish. He has participated in recordings for RCA, CRI, Golden Crest, Sony Classical, Deutsche Grammophon, Warner Brothers, Nonsuch, Reference Recordings, and BSO Classics labels.

Vytas is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Sonata for flute and piano, Rhapsodie and Danse Lente and on the "Spring Serenade" CD in Spring Serenade by Peter Schickele.

 

Andrea Bonsignore

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Andrea Bonsignore is a graduate of Oberlin College and New England Conservatory. She is the oboist for 6 theatres in the Boston area that present Broadway touring

productions, has been Principal Oboist for the ALabama Symphony, Hartford Symphony, Opera Company of Boston, Boston Landmarks Orchestra and is a member of North Winds - Massachusett’s Young Audience Woodwind Quintet .  In her capacity as a free-lancer, she has played and recorded with the Boston Symphony, Boston Pops, Emmanuel Music and appeared in YoYo Ma's video chronicling his music experiences at Tanglewood.  Additionally, she performs with Boston Ballet, Opera New England, and many other groups throughout New England.  She is the Coordinator (and performer) for Monadnock Music's “Lend an Ear” outreach program.  She authored “Doxie and Andre’s Flight Path” – a story inspired by the watercolors of Roger Kizik featuring two intrepid ducklings, and brought to life with music selections played by small ensembles of orchestral instruments.  In 2010 she toured nationally with the 75th Anniversary Prodcuction of "Porgy & Bess."  Her series of cell phone movies combining music and imagery of the South Coast is featured in the 2-12 and 2013 Buzzards Bay Film Festivals, and is one of Boston’s busiest art models.

Andrea is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Rhapsodie.

Ann Hobson Pilot

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After 40 years with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, legendary principal harpist, Ann Hobson Pilot, retired at the end of the Tanglewood 2009 season.

Ann Hobson Pilot is a graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music under Alice Chalifoux. She became principal harp of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1980, having joined the BSO in 1969 as assistant principal harp and principal with the Boston Pops. Before that she was substitute second harp with the Pittsburgh Symphony and principal harp of the Washington National Symphony.

Ms. Pilot has had an extensive solo career. She has performed with many American orchestras as soloist, as well as with orchestras in Europe, Haiti, New Zealand, and South Africa. She has several CDs available on the Boston Records label, as well as on the Koch International and Denouement labels. In September 1999 she traveled to London to record, with the London Symphony Orchestra, the Harp Concerto by the young American composer Kevin Kaska, a work that she commissioned.

In May of 2010, Ms. Pilot was the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Music degree from Tufts University. She has received numerous awards including the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Cleveland Institute of Music in 1993 and again in 2010 and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Boston Musicians Association in 2010. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Bridgewater State College in 1988.

In 1997 she traveled to South Africa to record a video documentary, “A Musical Journey”, sponsored by the Museum of Afro-American History and WGBH. The film aired nationwide on PBS for three years. While there she performed with the National Symphony of Johannesburg and visited the San people of Namibia.

Ms. Pilot is on the faculties of the New England Conservatory of Music, Boston University, Tanglewood Music Center, and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. She has performed with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, Marlboro Music Festival, Newport Music Festival, Sarasota Music Festival and the Ritz Chamber Players.

After the 2009 Tanglewood concerts and her official retirement, Pilot returned to the stage as soloist with the BSO opening the Boston Symphony season and the Carnegie Hall season with the premiere of a concerto written for her by John Williams, “On Willows and Birches” a concerto for harp and orchestra. On October 3, the orchestra paid tribute to her dedicating the entire concert in her honor and featuring her in two other works for solo harp in addition to the Williams.

Producer Susan Dangel has recently completed a new half-hour documentary that will tell the story of her life in music, “A Harpist’s Legacy, Ann Hobson Pilot and the Sound of Change”.

This season brings solo performances with the Shippensburg Festival Orchestra, the Chicago Sinfonietta, the Albany Symphony and the World Harp Congress in Vancouver.

She and her husband, Prentice Pilot, are currently residents of Osprey, Florida.

Ann is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Concert a Cinq and on the "Spring Serenade" CD in Chant de Linos by Andre Jolivet which will be released in 2013/2014.

 

Marjorie Bollinger Hogan

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Marjorie Bollinger Hogan gave her solo debut at age 14, with the Richey (FL) Community Band. Marjorie received a BA in Applied Flute from University of South Florida, where she studied with Martha Rearick. In 1987 Marjorie received USF’s Dawn Zimmerman Flute Award and won third prize in Florida Flute Association's Young Artist competition. Marjorie performed with the Florida Orchestra, Ft. Myers Symphony, and Naples Symphony and continued studies with Linda Toote and Geoffrey Gilbert. Marjorie attended the Hartt School of Music on a talent award scholarship and received a Master of Music in Applied Flute, under the tutelage of John Wion. Marjorie has performed and given masterclasses throughout the United States. Marjorie is currently Director of the Merrimack Valley Flute Choir and Principal Flute of Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra and Nashua Chamber Orchestra. She recently performed Rutter’s flute concerto, “Suite Antique,” with the Merrimack Valley Philharmonic.

Marjorie is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Elegie for flute quartet.

Rebecca Jeffreys

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Rebecca Jeffreys, flutistis based near Boston, Massachusetts. As a founding director and member of the nationally recognized Woodbridge (VA) Flute Choir, Rebecca gave concerto performances at the Kennedy Center and White House. Under Rebecca's direction, the Woodbridge Flute Choir commissioned numerous original works for flute choir, and produced two CDs. Her solo career has included a concerto performance in a private audience to Pope John Paul II in Rome, Italy and guest concerto performances with various orchestras and wind ensembles. She is a former member of the Jeffreys and Miller Latin Flute and Guitar Duo which made two East Coast tours. Additional concerts have included ensemble and solo performances at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Phillips Collection, and other prestigious East Coast locations. In 2000 she played in the NFA Professional Flute Choir at the National Flute Convention in Columbus, Ohio. Rebecca was the 2000-2002 President for the Washington Flute Society and the local arrangements chair for the 2002 National Flute Convention in Washington, DC. She performed Baikal Journey by Catherine McMichael at the 2002 Convention and lead a flute choir reading session.  Her debut album, "Tonescapes", features music for solo flute and multiple flutes written by today's composers including Catherine McMichael, Mel Lauf, Jr. and Steve Tung. It has received national and international attention. Rebecca returned to the Woodbridge Flute choir as guest performer to celebrate the choir's ten year anniversary and currently teaches at the Nashua (NH) Community Music School. She is a member of the Open Aire Ensemble (Marjorie Bollinger Hogan, flute and Molly Wood, pianist) which presents contemporary music with sweet moods and colors. Learn more at rebeccajeffreys.com.

Rebecca is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Elegie for flute quartet.

Aiven O'Leary

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Aiven O'Leary received her Masters of Music in flute performance from Indiana University and her Bachelor of Music degree from Ithaca College.  Her principal teachers have included Wendy Mehne, Claudia Anderson and Kathryn Lukas.  After graduating from Indiana University, Ms. O'Leary freelanced in the Boston area while teaching privately in Beverly ,MA.  She has served on the faculties of both the Indian Hill School of Music and Gordon College.  Ms. O'Leary is currently the headjoint maker for the Wm. S. Haynes Flute Company.

Aiven is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Elegie for flute quartet.

Nick Rubenstein

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Raised in Carlisle Massachusetts, Nicholas Rubenstein began playing the horn at the age of nine. In 2007, he received his Bachelor’s Degree from Northwestern University in Evanston Illinois, as a student of Gail Williams of the Chicago Symphony and William Barnewitz of the Milwaukee Symphony. Upon graduation, Nick moved to Florence, Italy to continue studies with the horn and pursue his life-long dream of becoming a chef. While in Florence, Nick won first in auditions for the Orchestra Giovanile Italiana, the Italian national youth orchestra, under the batons of Jeffrey Tate, Riccardo Muti, Gabriele Ferro, and Nicola Paszkowski , and was a member of the touring wind quintet “Zeitmasse.” His principal studies in Florence were with Guido Corti, and Giampaolo Pretto. Nick returned to the States and took up his studies with Richard Sebring of the Boston Symphony and received his Masters’ degree in Horn performance from the New England Conservatory in 2011. He continued with his Graduate studies from NEC receiving a graduate diploma under the tutelage of Eli Epstein formerly of the Cleveland Symphony, and under the baton of Hugh Wolff. Nick is an active freelancer in Boston and New England and frequently performs in the Boston Philharmonic, The Discovery Ensemble, Symphony Nova, The Springfield Symphony, Rhode Island Philharmonic and as principal horn of Boston Chamber Orchestra and Video Game Orchestra, as well as many others. Nicks’ passion for cooking continues still. He has worked as a chef at high-end restaurants in Florence, New York, and Boston, and has performed in over 16 countries.

Nick is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Rhapsodie.

 

Patricia Yee

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Patti Yee graduated with honors from the Hartt School of Music (West Hartford, CT) where she received Bachelors and Masters of Music degrees in performance and music education studying with prominent teachers Steven Maxym and Frank Morelli.  She is currently the principal bassoonist with the Lexington Symphony, where she was featured soloist, Lexington Chamber Players and the Claflin Hill Symphony Orchestra.  As a freelanced bassoonist she has performed with National Lyric Opera of New York touring orchestra, the Boston and Rhode Island Philharmonics, New Haven and Hartford Symphonies (CT), Emmanuel Music, Boston Virtuosi, Boston Bel Canto Opera, Orchestra of Indian Hill and many regional orchestras throughout New England.  An avid chamber musician, Patti has performed in and around the Boston area. She has performed live on WGBH Boston and will again in the spring of 2013 performing chamber music of Joseph Jongen.  She participated in the chamber music festival Le Festival International Du Domaine Forget, Quebec, Canada where she studied with Christopher Millard and in July 2010 where she studied with Giorgio Versiglia and performed at the Sebino International Music Festival, Pisogne, Italy.  Most recently, in 2011 Patti performed as a soloist with Musici Di Parma/Sebino Festival in Predore, Italy. She has been invited to be featured soloist performing the Mozart Bassoon Concerto in October 2012 with the Boston Chamber Orchestra.  A passionate educator for over twenty years she has served on the faculties of the University of Hartford/Hartt School of Music Preparatory Division, All Newton Music School, and Youth and Muse International Summer Festival, Boston Conservatory.  In addition to maintaining a busy performance schedule, Patti teaches bassoon for the Brockton and Walpole Public Schools.

Patricia is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Rhapsodie.

Rebecca Gitter

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Photo by Tom Kates 

Canadianborn violist Rebecca Gitter has been a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra viola section since August 2001.  Prior to joining the orchestra, she received her bachelor of music degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music, where she was a student of Robert Vernon.  An avid chamber musician, Ms. Gitter regularly performs in the BSO’s chamber music series, and has been a participant at the Marlboro Festival, Ravinia’s Steans Institute for Young Artists, the Taos School of Music, and the National Academy and National Youth Orchestras of Canada.

Rebecca is a performing artist on the "The Jongen Project" CD in Concert a Cinq.

Jason Horowitz

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Violinist Jason Horowitz joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra at the start of the 2006 Pops season. His many appearances in Boston's Jordan Hall have included solo recitals, concertos ranging from Bach to Scelsi and Schnittke, chamber music, and several world premieres, including the Violin Concerto of Donald Sur. Long involved with music of the Second Viennese School, he learned the violin concertos of Berg and Schoenberg from the legendary Louis Krasner. Mr. Horowitz received the New England Conservatory's highest performance honor, the Artist Diploma, in 1998; he joined the Munich Chamber Orchestra shortly thereafter, working privately with music director Christoph Poppen in Berlin and Munich. Mr. Horowitz has participated in the Tanglewood, Norfolk, and Banff festivals, and has performed chamber music across America, Europe, and Asia. Formerly assistant concertmaster of the Colorado Symphony, he has also been guest concertmaster for such orchestras as the BBC Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Hartford Symphony, and Rochester Symphony. Recent solo engagements have included the Mendelssohn concerto in the Czech Republic; the Menotti concerto with the Charleston Symphony; concertos by Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, and Mozart and Berlioz's Réverie et Caprice with the Breckenridge Chamber Orchestra; the concertoDistant Light by Peteris Vasks with Boston Ballet to choreography by Peter Martins; a series of performances of Corelli violin sonatas also with Boston Ballet; and Barber's Violin Concerto with the Lexington Sinfonietta in spring of 2006.

Jason is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Concert a Cinq.

Blaise Dejardin

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Blaise is a performing artist on "The Jongen Project" CD in Concert a Cinq. Please read his biography in the CD jacket insert.

  "The Jongen Project"     

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Released May 4, 2013 and available on Amazon.com

"Feautures the newly appointed principal cellist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Blaise Dejardin"
 

"Dear Linda, The Jongen recording is just beautiful. Your playing throughout the CD is just
beautiful and a pleasure to listen to. I wish all CD’s were this inspiring." - Sir James Galway
 
 

"I believe the performance is very elegant, refined into every detail and you play it in a beautiful intimate
way. It sounds very natural and with a lot of "joie de vivre" - Robert Waelkens
 

 
It is a conundrum of classical music that certain composers of indisputable talent, whose posthumous fame should be assured, can nonetheless be forgotten owing to changing fashions. The most famous example, of course, is the greatest of composers, Johann Sebastian Bach himself. Though Bach and some others (e.g., Charles-Valentin Alkan) have enjoyed rediscovery, still others are not yet so fortunate. With the sole exception of his organ music, the Belgian composer Joseph Jongen (1873-1953) falls into the latter category. The Jongen Project, a group of accomplished instrumentalists headed by flutist Linda Bento-Rei, has taken an important step in correcting this injustice by recording an all-Jongen CD which includes four beautiful chamber works. Conservative for their time, the Belgian's works are very “audience-friendly,” showing the influence of his countryman, César Franck, and, especially, Claude Debussy, though Jongen's musical language is consistently distinctive.
 
Written in 1923, the Concert à cinq, Op. 71, is scored for harp, flute, and string trio, and shows the unmistakable influence of French impressionism. Though they are largely orchestral musicians, the players demonstrate outstanding chamber music skills. In addition to Bento-Rei, violinist Jason Horowitz, violist Rebecca Gitter, cellist Blaise Déjardin (all current members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's string section), and retired BSO principal harpist Ann Hobson Pilot all collaborate and interact with the flexibility, grace, and seamlessness of a seasoned ensemble. The largely extroverted first movement, played persuasively here, contrasts starkly with the second. Placed at the center of the larger work, the second movement's penitential tune, modal and bittersweet, is one of Jongen's exceptional creations, and the artists play it affectingly. The third and final movement's Spanish flavor and luscious harmonic vocabulary are also hallmarks of the French impressionists, but in the unexpected final bare-octaves chord where Debussy and Ravel would likely have signed off with harmony, Jongen stakes out his own territory. Yet amidst all the preceding gorgeous colors of the movement, the players' insistent rhythm, like castanets, pulls the listener along irresistibly. This enchanting work would make a fine program companion for Debussy's Sonata for flute, viola, and harp, Ravel's Introduction et Allegro, and André Jolivet's Chant de Linos—the last, in its later version, scored for Jongen's exact instrumentation.
 
The four-movement, 30-minute Sonata for flute and piano, Op. 77, is a major rediscovery for the flute repertoire. Though its Gallic provenance is evident, it yet retains a savor unique to Jongen. Linda Bento-Rei and pianist Vytas Baksys are expert tour guides through the many landscapes of the first movement: powerfully dramatic, playful, singing, and mysterious. The second movement is a brilliant scherzo-étude with delicious staccato passages offset by silky legato themes; in these performers' highly capable hands it is a thrilling and delicious experience. The third movement would seem to be Jongen's tip of the hat to both Ravel and Debussy. The outer sections are spare in texture—very much in Ravel's late style dépouillé (stripped-down); the central section bears more than a passing resemblance to Debussy's piano prelude The Sunken Cathedral, based on a Breton legend of a submerged cathedral that rises out of the sea once a year only to sink below the waves again. To the swirling waters and iridescent colors Baksys summons up, Bento-Rei adds flute interjections evoking seabirds soaring around the great edifice. After these sumptuous harmonies, the return to the simplicity of the movement's opening is genuinely moving. The final movement is an exhilarating jig which also regularly superimposes lyrical writing for both instruments over the compelling dance rhythm. The players' ability to conjure multiple moods is as impressive as their technical virtuosity. One hopes that many talented flutists and flute teachers will hear this fine performance and seek out this neglected masterwork.
 
Jongen's Rhapsodie, Op. 70 is scored for the unusual combination of piano with woodwind quintet—Vytas Baksys, piano; Linda Bento-Rei, flute; Andrea Bonsignore, oboe; Catherine Hudgins, clarinet; Patricia Yee, bassoon; and Nick Rubenstein, horn. As its name implies, the work is a loosely structured series of varying moods and tempi. The Modéré opening section introduces the individual wind instruments sequentially, punctuated by arpeggios from flute and piano in lush French impressionist style. This is followed by a sharply contrasting Moorish habanera (if such a thing were possible) whose characteristic rhythm is supplied by the piano, with a changing instrumentation playing the theme over it. The players' subtle rubatono doubt difficult to achieve without a conductor—makes this section smoky and seductive. A third section, Molto vivo, brings us vigorously back into bright sunshine while ingeniously weaving in echoes from the two previous sections. A more moderate passage is left initially to the wind instruments only, becoming still more relaxed and lyrical when the piano reënters. Nonetheless, it builds up before long to the powerful triple-meter final section, full of jubilation. Soon enough, in keeping with the freedom of a rhapsody, the energy begins to taper off as the music seems about to drift into slumber. One last time the composer skillfully reintroduces material from the work's opening section, as if in the vague recollection of a dream, before the surprise of a final outburst of joy. Baksys, Bento-Rei, Bonsignore, Hudgins, Yee, and Rubenstein have the sound of an experienced chamber group: each individual gracefully takes and yields the spotlight as appropriate, and as a group, their intonation, balances, and ensemble are all one could wish for. This is another vividly evocative rendition and one that should arouse the interest of wind ensembles (with access to an excellent pianist!) hoping to enlarge their repertoire.
 
The Danse lente, Op. 56, stands somewhat apart from its discmates, not merely for its date of composition—1918 vs. 1922-1924—but also for its simplicity and general feeling of introspection. The composer created a version for flute and harp, and another, only slightly modified, for flute and piano. Bento-Rei and Baksys give us the latter in a simple, direct reading that is the more moving for its avoidance of “interpretation.” Given the work's date, one might expect a dirge for war-torn Europe, but aside from one expansive climax, the prevailing mood is of a bittersweet, gentle yearning. (It is worth noting that the piece was written in London, where Jongen lived in exile during World War I.) The final harmony is particularly evocative of unfulfilled desire for resolution: the piano forms a minor seventh chord while the flute adds the ninth to it, but neither seventh nor ninth resolves as expected to the tonic chord, as if the composer were telling us that sometimes we simply have to learn to live without what we yearn for.
 
In my view, this recording is a resounding success on all counts. Its performances are passionately committed and beautiful; the selection of repertoire enables the listener to hear Joseph Jongen's musical influences but also the aspects of his music that make it uniquely his; the excellent program notes by Steven Ledbetter are helpful to connoisseur and layperson alike; and the sensitive engineering of Antonio Oliart has resulted in exemplary sound quality, both sumptuous and transparent, detailed and atmospheric. I hope this is Volume 1 in a series exploring the chamber music of this composer so unjustly neglected. 
-Geoff Wieting, The Boston Music Intelligencer
 

The Jongen Project/Linda Bento-Rei: CD Review

Jun 1, 2015 by 

The Jongen Project/Linda Bento-Rei: CD Review

Linda Bento-Rei has recorded a fascinating CD of chamber works for flute by the Belgian composer Joseph Jongen (1873-1953).  While not as well known today, Jongen was one of the best known Belgian composers of the early 20th century.  His music is conservative for the time, influenced by late 19th century French tradition, although his music was later influenced by newer music including Stravinsky and the composer’s of “Les Six."

There are three large chamber pieces for flute on the recording: the Concert a Cinq for harp, flute and strings, Opus 71, the Sonata for flute and piano, Op. 77 and the Rhapsodie, for piano and wind quintet, Op.70.  These three works were all written between 1922 and 1924.  They are beautifully crafted works with singing, soaring flute lines and interesting harmonic choices as the composer starts to absorb the radical changes in musical language going on at the time the pieces were written.

Bento-Rei has put together an excellent group of chamber collaborators and she plays each piece with superb tone, rhythm and musicality.  It’s a pleasure to listen to this lovely CD, and it’s a great opportunity to get familiar with Jongen’s music and perhaps add a piece or two to one’s flute repertoire!!

The CD is beautifully packaged, from the gorgeous cover art using a painting- La Pointe du Rossignol by Theo van Rysselgerghe (1904) to the thoughtful and extensive program notes on the music, composer, and performing artists. The CD is very thoughtfully put together and beautifully played.

--Barbara Siesel


Netherlands Flute Society

The Jongen Project. Music of Joseph Jongen (1873-1953). Linda Bento-Rei fluit. Concert à Cinq op. 71, Sonate pour flûte et piano op. 77, Rhapsodie voor fluit, hobo, klarinet, fagot, hoorn en piano op. 70, Danse Lente pour flûte et piano op. 56. Opname in beheer van het Worcester Symphony Orchestra 2013.

Deze Amerikaanse cd omvat werkelijk een ‘project’: alleen kamermuziekwerken met fluit van de Belgische componist Joseph Jongen. Jongen heeft van veel kanten invloeden ondergaan: Belgische, Duitse en Franse (Debussy en Ravel!), wat zijn muziek een geheel eigen karakter geeft. Zelfs Stravinsky en de ‘Six’ zijn te horen in sommige speelse gedeelten. De drie grote werken op de cd zijn ontstaan tussen 1922 en 1924, deDanse Lente in 1918 in Engeland, waar hij naartoe gevlucht was vanwege de Eerste Wereldoorlog. De uitvoering van deze toch wel gecompliceerde muziek is heel mooi, alle uitvoerenden zitten op één lijn met hun expressie en klankkleuren. De fluit is niet zozeer het solo-instrument, maar meer ‘one of the guys’, met een warme persoonlijke toon, die zich snel kan aanpassen aan de muzikale omgeving. Hoewel er iets voor te zeggen zou zijn om Joseph Jongen als een meer Frans-georiënteerde componist te beschouwen (de Sonate is opgedragen aan René Le Roy), laten deze Amerikanen horen dat ze zich historisch goed geïnformeerd hebben.

The Jongen Project. Music of Joseph Jongen (1873-1953). Linda Bento-Rei flute. Concert à Cinq op. 71, Sonate pour flûte et piano op. 77, Rhapsodie for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, French horn and piano op. 70, Danse Lente pour flûte et piano op. 56. Recording under the management of the Worcester Symphony Orchestra 2013.

This American cd is  really a project: only chamber music pieces including the flute, by the Belgian composer Joseph Jongen. Jongen was influenced a lot from many sides: Belgian, German and French (Debussy and Ravel!) which results in a music with a completely particular character. One can even hear Stravinsky and the ‘Six’ in some of the playful movements. The three main works on the cd date from 1922 to 1924, the Danse Lente from 1918 in England, to where he was escaped because of World War I. The performance of this rather complicated music is very beautiful. All performers are one with their expression and color of sound. The flute is more ‘one of the guys’ than a solo-instrument, with a warm personal tone which adepts to the musical environment. One could say that Joseph Jongen is a more French-orientated

Composer (the Sonate is dedicated to René Le Roy) but one can hear that these Americans are historically well informed. 


 

To purchase a CD online through Paypal please send $20 plus $5 shipping to steverei@gmail.com. Please email lmbrei@gmail.com with your shipping address.

To purchase a CD using a major credit card please email lmbrei@gmail.com.

Also available at Amazon.com

 

 

"Invocation"

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Released on October 15, 2015  and available for sale on Amazon.com


Here are some reviews -

Geoff Wieting, Boston Music Intelligencer:

Recordings
The superb flutist Linda Bento-Rei’s newest CD, titled “Invocation”, brings together a wonderfully diverse set of 20th- and 21st-century chamber works. As central performer, Bento-Rei demonstrates a versatility that is nothing short of astounding, and her colleagues are of equal caliber. Lovers of classical, jazz, and Latin music–of many styles!–will find a great deal to enjoy in these virtually definitive performances. 


This CD consists of works by four composers ranging from a wide variety of styles and instrumentations. For flute and piano, there is Peter Schickele, Spring Serenade, writing under his own name; for wind sextet, Leos Janacek, Mladi; for flute, string trio and harp, Andre Olivet, Chant de Linos and for flute and salsa rhythm section, Mike Mower, Sonata Latino. 


The most striking observation of this CD is the ensemble work, which is exemplary and flawless throughout. Special mention must be made of the extraordinary playing of pianist Vytas Baksys, which is accurately supportive in the Schickele and rhythmically authentic in the complex salsa underpinnings of the Mower.


This is an absolutely outstanding recording. The excellences one looks for in flute playing are here. Ms. Bento-Rei’s intonation is impeccable, as is her articulation. She performs passages of dazzling virtuosity, especially in the Schickele, in addition to other virtues which are beyond the expected. Her flute sound in strong passages is as rich and full as I’ve heard on that instrument, while in softer passages, especially in the Janacek, it has a beautiful delicacy. Her playing has, when necessary, a quite extraordinary authority, often of a degree which one more commonly finds in a lead trumpet. And none of this comes at a price: there are, to my ear, no moments of compromise, no places where, for example, emotion is sacrificed for mechanical precision, or sound for speed. The playing throughout has great integrity: all its virtues are in the service of a larger musicality.


The most unique and enjoyable piece, for me is the Mower. Here the flute is the single voice, supported by piano, bass, drums, and three Latin percussionists, all of whom are outstanding players. In this music the complex rhythmic base is crucial: these players got it right, and the flute riding over the top of it is an ongoing lifting of the spirit. There is one passage (at about 3:40 of the “Rumbango”) which is irresistible. This is a performance by a flutist who has mastered her instrument and is having quite a wonderful time with that. 

 

 - Harry Schroeder, Music Critic, Solares Hill Newspaper, The Key West Citizen


"I was enchanted with your "Invocation" CD and loaned it to a student. I believe it greatly influenced her tone…she sounds so much more free and fluid after living with Your CD...." - Teresa Texeira flutist/teacher

 

From Mike Mower -

Hi Linda,

I've just checked out your album, which arrived this morning, and… congratulations! I've heard over fifty recordings of Sonata Latino, and I think your rendition is probably the best...

I't's great when musicians really "get" a piece and play it in the sprit intended. Your articulation, timing, sense of drama and an un-sentimental rendition are perfect for this genre - but it's not just you! Please send my congratulations also to Vytas (especially), Fernando and the guys - you've picked a team that obviously do this stuff naturally all the time and are not "classical musicians playing at jazz" (sorry if that sounds patronising!), a rare treat to listen to.

It's a nicely produced CD too - a great mixed sound, elegant cover, liner notes - and a "single" release as well! I particularly enjoyed listening for the first time to the Janacek too (it makes for a much more beefy sound to a wind quintet by adding bass clarinet). The Jolivet provides a welcome tonal contrast too - all beautifully played by your hand-picked ensembles. I think it's an album you can really be proud of, highlighting not just your personal playing but terrific ensembling and a great diversity of music making the whole CD very listenable from start to finish. Well done!

Best wishes,

Mike

Brooks Hall Concert

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Brooks Concert Hall

 

The Brooks Concert Hall is an acoustically superb concert hall seating about 250 people. It is the venue for most concerts performed by faculty (Holy Cross Chamber Players) and student performing organizations. It houses two concert grand pianos: a Steinway Concert D and a Steinway Concert B. It also contains a two-manual William Dowd harpsichord, and recently the 1840 Thomas Appleton Organ.

 

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 4 PM - Duo concert with Vytas Baksys.

Program includes:

Sonata in G Minor, CPE Bach

Sonata Latino, Mike Mower

Sonata, Joseph Jongen

Spring Serenade, Peter Schickele

Danse Lente, Joseph Jongen

 

Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 8 PM - Chamber music concert with Ann Hobson Pilot, Carol Lieberman, Mark Kroll.

Program includes:

Debussy Trio for flute, viola and harp

Histoire du Tango for flute and harp by Piazzolla

 

Nathaniel Farny

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Nathaniel Farny plays with many Boston area groups, including the Boston Modern Orchestra Project and the Orchestra of Emmanuel Music. He is a member of the Alcyon Chamber Ensemble and is on the faculty of the Cambridge School of Weston and the Intensive Community Program of Boston. He has performed with the Boston Symphony as an extra player since 2010. During the summers he has served as a chamber music coach at the Interlochen Adult Chamber Music Camp and played in the orchestra of the Crested Butte Music Festival in Colorado. He received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from Boston University, where he studied with Steven Ansell. 

Nat is a performing artist on the "Spring Serenade" CD in Chant de Linos by Andre Jolivet which will be released in 2013/2014.

 

Michael Curry

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Michael Curry, cellist,is originally from New Jersey, and is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard and New England Conservatory.  His began piano lessons at the age of 4 and later attended Juilliard Pre-College.  His major cello teachers were David Finckel and Laurence Lesser; he studied chamber music with Louis Krasner, Gilbert Kalish, Joseph Silverstein, Leon Kirchner, and others. Awarded two fellowships to study at Tanglewood, he was principal of the orchestra under Ozawa and Rozhdestvensky, assistant principal under Bernstein, and won the Albert Spalding Prize for outstanding string playing. 

His professional career began at the age of 15 and has included engagements with the Boston Pops, Opera Company of Boston, Pepsico Summerfare, Harvard Chamber Orchestra, Cantata Singers, and Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra, and principal or continuo roles with the Boston Philharmonic, Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Ballet, and Boston Classical Orchestra. Michael has made chamber music appearances at the Monadnock Music summer festival and at such venues as Weill and Alice Tully Halls, the United Nations, Dumbarton Oaks, and Chartres Cathedral.   He has also played approximately 2,000 performances as solo cellist at the Colonial Theater, Opera House, and several other theaters.

 He has been regular solo cellist with Emmanuel Music for over 25 years, playing in numerous productions including continuo in the Handel operas and Bach Christmas Oratorio, and appearing in their Brahms, Schubert, Schoenberg, and Beethoven chamber music series.  He has played over a hundred Bach Cantatas in Emmanuel’s cycle under founder Craig Smith and guest conductors Ozawa and Hogwood.  His performances at Emmanuel have been praised in the Boston Musical Intelligencer as “unfailingly sensitive,” with “rich tone” and “intense accuracy.”

 As a long-time member of Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble, he premiered dozens of new chamber works by such composers as Harbison, Shapey, Hartke, Druckman, Maxwell Davies, Weir, and Adès, and performed and lectured as a guest of Brown University, the Salzburg Mozarteum, the Ijsbrekker in Amsterdam, and the Beijing Modern Music Festival.  He participated in the Pulitzer Prize winning premiere of Spratlan’s “Life is a Dream,” and is seen with the ensemble performing “Septet but Equal” in the documentary video “Babbitt: Portrait of a Serial Composer.”

 Michael has performed chamber and continuo repertoire with Mark Morris Dance Group in Boston and New York, and is credited in Acocella’s biography of the choreographer for the world premiere of his “Jesu, meine Freude.”  He participated in Peter Sellars’ staged production of Bach Cantatas (solo/continuo) with Lorraine Hunt Lieberson at Lincoln Center, in London, Paris, Amsterdam, and the Vienna and Lucerne Festivals, and is heard in the award-winning and best-selling Nonesuch audio recording of that production.  He has recorded for over a dozen other labels including New World, Naxos, Bridge, Koch International, and Blue Note.

 When he is not occupied with performing, Michael enjoys hiking, European travel, Asian food, and collecting recordings and rare books.

Michael is a performing artist in Chant de Linos by Andre Jolivet on the "Spring Serenade" CD which will be released in 2013/2014.

Antonio Oliart

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Antonio Oliart has been at WGBH since 1995. His training includes a Masters of Music degree in flute performance from The Mannes College of Music in New York City. He also holds a Masters Degree in Sound Recording from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. He has produced CD's for labels such as Analekta Records, Warner in Japan, Centaur, Hungaroton and has worked for Philips, Erato, Teldec, Telarc, Koch International, Deutsche Grammophon and many other record companies as a recording engineer, editor and mastering engineer. Antonio has won several awards for his work at WGBH including three New England Emmy awards for outstanding individual achievement in audio.

 

Brown Hall Concert

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Sunday, January 5, 2014 at 3 PM "The Jongen Project" at Brown Hall

New England Conservatory

30 Gainsborough Street

Boston, MA

Admission is FREE!

Worcester T & G

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Linda Bento-Rei, shown playing the flute in her Worcester home, just released her first CD, "The Jongen Project." (T&G STAFF/CHRISTINE PETERSON)

 

Friday, January 10, 2014
 

Worcester flutist's CD revives works of little-known composer

 

 

 
 
 
When Worcester flutist Linda Bento-Rei was at a flutist's convention in Washington, D.C., a few years ago, she wasn't particularly enthused with a suggestion that she attend a concert featuring Concert à Cinq by Belgian composer Joseph Jongen. 

For one thing, who was/is he? 

"A friend of mine dragged me to the concert," Bento-Rei recalled. "I wanted to go to another concert." 

She soon changed her tune. 

The performance of the work — for flute, string trio and harp — by Arpea Ensemble was "magical," she said. The music was a revelation. 

"It was incredible, it was so intense." 

There were about 200 flute players in the audience, who can be a tough crowd on such occasions, Bento-Rei noted. By the end of the performance, "There wasn't a dry eye." 

Bento-Rei wasn't familiar with the work of Jongen (1873-1953), a composer, organist and educator who, while well-regarded in his time, has slipped into obscurity. 

"Not at all," she said. 

She is much better versed now. Bento-Rei's first CD, "The Jongen Project," has just been released consisting of four of Jongen's chamber music compositions for flute and other instruments including Concert à Cinq. A CD release concert was performed Jan. 5 in Brown Hall at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, where Bento-Rei earned a master of music degree in flute performance. 

"Obviously, I'm having a love affair with his music," Bento-Rei said of Jongen. Being "dragged" to that concert "created a whole chain of serendipitous events. I would never have considered a recording project." 

Jongen's music has been termed as "civilized yet sensual." A description of Concert à Cinq once called the first movement "shot through with sunlight," the slow second movement "pensive," and the final movement evocative of a Spanish rhapsody. 

Bento-Rei had been so impressed she bought the score and "put it on my project list." 

There it sat for a while. However, when her mother became gravely ill with Alzheimer's disease (Margaret "Mary" Bento died in December 2010) Bento-Rei said she was looking for "a distraction." She looked at her project list and remembered how deeply emotional and rich Jongen's music had struck her. 

"It just seemed to be the perfect conduit to let go all the grief. The perfect music." 

Bento-Rei gathered an ensemble of accomplished musicians and put on several concerts of Concert à Cinq, including one at Clark University. 

Next, "I thought it was worthy of recording. There aren't many recordings of it," Bento-Rei said. She also began exploring other Jongen compositions and found the same elements were true — beautiful music rarely performed or recorded for posterity. These included Sonata, for flute and piano ("no one knows about it," Bento-Rei said); Rhapsodie, for piano and wind quintet ("a series of varied tempos and moods"); and Dense lente, for flute and piano ("a brief lyrical work, pensive and quietly sustained"). 

The four compositions make up "The Jongen Project" CD. Recording spanned over a year at the Fraser Performance Studio, WGBH, Boston, and involved 13 musicians. 

Bento-Rei grew up in Milford, where her discovery of the flute was rather like her introduction to Jongen — somewhat by chance. 

At school, "I did not sign up for band when everyone else did," she recalled. However, all of her friends did sign up, and Bento-Rei was missing their company. 

"So I went to the band director and said 'I need to catch up. Give me an instrument that's easy to play.' " 

The band director suggested the flute, which isn't easy to play. But the director's choice proved to be inspired, although Bento-Rei may not have thought so at first. As she began to practice, she said she thought "Oh my God, this is endless. It will take me 10 lifetimes to learn how to play." 

Bento-Rei also graduated from the Boston Conservatory of Music, performs as a soloist and in chamber music and orchestral performances and teaches music. She and her husband, Stephen Rei, an attorney, lived several years in Hopedale before moving to Worcester, where their joint project has been restoring an early 20th-century home. 

At least one encyclopedia of classical music doesn't mention Jongen at all. Maybe "The Jongen Project" will remedy that and restore his reputation. 

But notwithstanding the emotional reaction to the Concert à Cinq concert, Jongen's music can be challenging, "difficult" even, Bento-Rei acknowledged, 

"Difficult, then if you take the time, it's addictive," she added. Besides which, "It's all so fresh," she said. "Jongen's music is relatively unknown, absolutely gorgeous, richly emotional, under-performed and hardly recorded. So the entire CD/program is completely fresh." 

At the Jan. 5 CD release concert, which was attended by more than 100 people, "The audience was so mesmerized," Bento-Rei said. 

"Now I'm putting the CD in the hands of lay people and getting their feedback…Obviously I'm not anticipating making a lot of money out of the project. But the idea of legacy is very important to me. And I'm getting feedback that people are liking it." 

For more information and to purchase "The Jongen Project" CD, visit www.lindabento-rei.com. 

Contact Richard Duckett at Richard.Duckett@telegram.com 

News & Reviews

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"Dear Linda, The Jongen recording is just beautiful. Your playing throughout the CD is just beautiful and a pleasure to listen to. I wish all CD’s were this inspiring." - Sir James Galway

 

 

Boston Musical Intelligencer

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in: reviews

JANUARY 7, 2014

Injustice Overturned for Jongen

by 

It is a delicious feeling to be “in the know” when few others are. I had that feeling momentarily at “The Jongen Project” CD Release Concert at New England Conservatory’s Brown Hall Sunday afternoon. In her introductory remarks, oboist Andrea Bonsignore stated that in her 40 years as a professional musician she had never encountered the music of the once world-renowned Belgian composer Joseph Jongen (1873-1953) until this recording and concert were planned. I wanted to reply that most organists have played or at least heard his superb organ works (as an organist myself, I count him among my favorite composers to perform) though nearly all of us remain in the dark when it comes to his works in other genres.

The concert opened with Jongen’s Élégie, scored for a quartet of flutes, played by Linda Bento-Rei, Aiven O’Leary, Marjorie Hogan, and Katie Farrington. Within a comparatively narrow pitch range and using four instruments of the same timbre, the composer found an impressive array of textures and colors, helped, of course, by the imaginative playing of the quartet. It began with solo flute Bento-Rei spinning out a melody of longing memory over a pulsating accompaniment that later became an impressionistic undulating. Occasionally, phrase attacks were also a bit “impressionistic” as well; a bit of “conducting” by one of the quartet members would not have gone amiss here. Eventually, the texture was simplified into pairs of flutes alternating with each other. There were sighing figures and the kaleidoscopic harmonies that I associate with many of Jongen’s organ works. This gentle elegy made an unconventional but touching beginning to the concert.

Jongen’s Sonata for Flute and Piano of 1924 is a four-movement, half-hour masterwork that seems a good deal shorter. Bento-Rei and pianist Vytas Baksys, encountering a musical smorgasbord, shared it liberally. The first movement Prélude, opening with bracing octaves and chords in the piano, was by turns dramatic, rhapsodic, lyrical, and reflective. The Animé scherzo is largely an effervescent staccato showpiece (though not without a few sustained passages) that impressed and charmed. The third movement, Modéré, begins with a spare texture of two voices in the piano, much in the mode of Maurice Ravel’s late style dépouillé (stripped-down style), but when the flute enters, the harmony becomes more colorful. Especially striking was a piano interlude reminiscent of Claude Debussy’s piano prelude “The Engulfed Cathedral” which depicts a cathedral rising out of the ocean; here Bento-Rei added interjections evoking seabirds. The movement concludes with a moving return to the spare opening texture, this time including the flute. The final Gigue begins with yet another piano solo, Baksys setting the brilliant jig rhythm. Bento-Rei’s entrance, however, temporarily subverted this with a showy cadenza completely free of metrical constraints; soon enough, though, the flute joins the piano in the jig. Yet even in this breathless dance, the composer inserts some duple-meter passages of lyrical beauty. The artists made the most of these contrasts on the way to the brilliant ending; a final fragment of the jig subject provided an exclamation point. This sonata by rights should take its place in the standard flute repertoire alongside the works of Carl Reinecke, Gabriel Fauré, Francis Poulenc, and Serge Prokofiev.

The Rhapsodie (1922) for woodwind quintet and piano was the program’s pièce de résistance. Bento-Rei and Baksys were joined by oboist Andrea Bonsignore, clarinetist Catherine Hudgins, bassoonist Patricia Yee, and hornist Nick Rubenstein. The players’ sense of fantasy and adventure made this delicious. To cite one example, a kind of Moorish habanera early on, played initially by the upper winds and piano and then the whole ensemble created an exotic atmosphere, having both unanimity of ensemble and flexible rhythm. The only slight distraction was from a few brief dominations of the texture by the over-exuberant horn. Generally, though, the give-and-take was very satisfying. After its numerous opportunities—fully exploited by all the players—to display musical and technical skill, the work seemed to trail off drowsily to a peaceful ending until the ensemble surprised us with one last eruption of jubilation. Jongen’s Rhapsodie, performed at this high level, could hardly fail to find an audience among music-lovers of all stripes.

If I were arranging this program, the Rhapsodie would come last because all else would be anti-climactic. But the program finished as unconventionally as it began—with the Danse lente for flute and piano. Though composed in 1918 and characterized by a steady triple meter, “Slow Dance” didn’t feel like a dance or the elegy for war-torn Europe one might expect; rather, it had a touching, bittersweet nostalgia that the simple, direct playing of Bento-Rei and Baksys underlined. So we went out with a lovely whimper, not a bang, introduced to another elegant, contemplative flute work somewhat in the manner of Fauré’s Morceau de concours, if less sunny.

As Bonsignore noted at the outset, it is baffling that some outstanding composers can fall into virtual oblivion in just a few decades. However, for a performing musician the pleasure of holding a “secret” of this type is not to keep it but to share it with a wider public, to unearth “buried treasures.” I would guess this was the major motivation for the performers at this concert, and they took pains to prepare a beautiful performance. Let us hope that this concert as well as the new CD by these artists will begin to correct the injustice of Joseph Jongen’s neglect outside of the organ world.

Geoffrey Wieting holds Bachelor’s degrees in organ and Latin from Oberlin College and a Master’s degree in collaborative piano from New England Conservatory. He is a freelance organist, collaborative pianist and vocal coach. He sings with the Back Bay Chorale and serves on the Board of Directors of the Old West Organ Society.

 

 Upcoming Concerts

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Vytas J. Baksys and Linda Bento-Rei 

 
 
 "I just got your CD, "NOEL" and listened to it. I like it a lot—it really is excellent. Your playing is appropriate to what you’re doing—sometimes jaunty, sometimes tender, very eloquent, and always musical. One quality I particularly like is the width of the vibrato, which is just right—always expressive, never sentimental. And you really do have one of the finest flute sounds anywhere.Vytas, as always, is terrific: relaxed but precise in touch and time, generous in feeling, and the two of you play together marvelously...." -  Harry Schroeder
 
"I was enchanted with your "Invocation" CD and loaned it to a student.
I believe it greatly influenced her tone…she sounds so much more free and fluid after living with 
Your CD...." - Teresa Texeira flutist/teacher 
 
 

~ Upcoming Concerts ~

"What a thrilling concert you and the gentlemen performed for the "Friends of Music" audience this evening.  A standing ovation is not a usual occurrence for us but "SMV" definitely earned/deserved it tonight!!"......Friend of Music Committee, St. Boniface Episcopal Church, Siesta Key RE: 11/12/17 with Mackenzie Melemed

 

  • Thursday, April 19, 2018 at 7:30 PM, Bay Village of Sarasota 

 

  • Sunday, March 25, 2018 at 6:00 PM, Sunset Classics Chamber Music Concert, Bradenton
  • Sunday, March 11, 2018 at 7:00 PM at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 508 Riviera Street, Venice, FL
  • Sunday, February 25, 2018 at 4:30 PM at Amore Restaurant, 446 S Pineapple Ave, Sarasota Linda Bento-Rei & Betsy Hudson Traba, flutes in concert at 5:30 PM ~ Cocktails & Appetizers at 4:30 PM
  • Sunday, February 4, 2018 at 5:30 PM at St.. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Boca Grande, FL
  • Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 6:00 PM, Sunset Classics Chamber Music with SMV WWQ in "Peter adn the Wolf" narrated by WUSF Radio Host, Susan Giles Wantuck, Manatee Performing Arts Center, Bradenton
  • Sunday, Janaury 7, 2018 at 5:00 PM at First Congregational Church, Sarasota
  • Friday, January 5, 2018 at 7:00 PM at ART AVENUE Art Gallery, Westfield Mall, 3501 S Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34239 with Vytas J. Baksys
  • Thursday, January 4, 2018 at 7:30 PM at Bay Village, 8400 Vamo Rd, Sarasota, FL 34231 with Vytas J. Baksys, pianist with the Boston Symphony
  • Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 6:00 PM, Sunset Classics Chamber Music Concert, Manatee Performing Arts Center, Bradenton with Susan Knapp Thomas, harp in "Divine Inspirations II"
  • Friday, November 24, 2017 at 7 PM at ART AVENUE Art Gallery, Westfield Mall, Sarasota with Don Bryn, Piano
  • Sunday, November 12, 2017 at 6:00 PM Sarasota Musica Viva Chamber Music with guest Pianist Mackenzie Melemed from Juilliard at St. Boniface Episcopal Church, Siesta Key, FL
  • Monday, September 25, 2017 at 7 PM at First Congregational Church, Sarasota
  • Sunday, September 24, 2017 at 6:00 PM*** Sunset Classics Chamber Music Concert, Manatee Performaning Arts Center, Bradenton in "Dreamscapes" with Don Bryn, piano
  • Saturday, July 15, 2017 at 8:00 PM, Newport Contemporary Music Festival
  • Saturday, July 1, 2017 at 8:00 PM, Newport Contemporary Music Festival, Newport, RI
  • Friday, June 23, 2017 at 1:00 PM, "Atomic Trio" with Nora Lee Garcia and Nicolas Real at University of Central Florida, College of Music
  • Sunday, April 9, 2017 at 5:00 PM Sarasota Musica Viva Chamber Music Concert at ART AVENUE Art Gallery, Westfield Mall, Sarasota
  • Friday, January 27, 2017 at 7:00 PM at ART AVENUE Art Gallery with Marje Hogan, flute and Tom Purviance, piano. Westfield Southgate Mall, 3801 S. Tamiami Trail, FL.
  • Sunday, January 22, 2017 at 5:00 PM Sarasota Musica Viva Concert with Susan Knapp Thomas, harp and Linda Bento-Rei, flute at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Boca Grande, FL
  • Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 5:30 PM Sunset Classica Chamber Music Concert with Sarasota Musica Viva, "Trio d'amore" at Manatee Performaning Arts Center, Bradenton, FL with Andrea Bonsignore, oboe and English Horn, Linda Bento-Rei, flute, Don Byrn, piano

2015-2016 Performances

  • Monday, December 5, 2016 at 7:00 PM Festive Chamber Music Concert with Sarasota Musica Viva featuring guest artist Mark Kroll, haprsichordist with the Boston Symphony and Betsy Hudson Traba, principal flute with Sarasota Orchestra, Linda Bento-Rei, flute at First Congregational Church, Sarasota FL
  • Sunday, October 30, 2016 at 1:00 PM at St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Manchester, NH. "Concert with Vytas Baksys, Piano and Master Class"
  • Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 4:00 PM, "Women, Wellness and Wine" at Manatee Performing Arts Center, Bradenton
  • Sunday, October 9, 2016 at 5:30 PM Sunset Classics Chamber Music Concert with Sarasota Musica Viva  "Memorable Melodies" at Manatee Performing Arts Center, Bradenton, FL
  • Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 6:00 PM at Manatee Community Center, Bradenton. "Celebrating the 2016 Giving Challenge!" 
  • Friday, March 18, 2016 at 7:00 PM Flute Orchestra performance of original
  • compositions conducted by Venezuelan flutist/composer, Dr. Nicolas Real
  • Sunday, February 21, 2016 at 7:30 PM with the Venice Symphony Chamber Players and guest artists Ann Hobson-Pilot and Vytas J. Baksys at the Grace Methodist Church on Field Road in Venice, FL
  • Friday, February 19, 2016 at 7 PM concert with pianist, Vytas J. Baksys at the United Methodist Church on Pineapple Drive, Sarasota, FL
  • Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 6 PM concert and master class with BSO pianist, Vytas J. Baksys at the Players School, Clearwater, FL
  • Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 7:30 PM concert with Andrea Bonsignore, oboe and Vytas J. Baksys, piano
  • Monday, January 4, 2016 concert with percussionists Dean Anderson and Tihda Vongkoth
  • Saturday, November 28, 2015 at 7:00 PM Church of the Holy Spirit, 129 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey FL with percussionists Dean Anderson & Tihda Vongkoth 
  • Sunday, November 15, 2015 at 5:00 PM Pine Shores Presbyterian Church, 6135 Beechwood Ave., Sarasota, FL with harpist Ann Hobson-Pilot ~ Program includes Sonata in F Major by Benedetto Marcello; Danse Lente by Joseph Jongen; Selections from Recuerdos de Viaje by Isaac Albeniz; Sonata for flute and harp & Paquito by Andy Scott; Romance by Camille Saint-Saens; Ballet & We Will Meet Again by P.M. Bokulic; Histoire du Tango by Astor Piazzolla
  • Sunday, October 18, 2015 at 9:00 AM Pineshores Presbyterian Church Worship with Betsy Hudson Traber
  • Sunday, October 4, 2015 at 6:00 PM at the home of Tim Terranella, 75 Church Street, Clinton, MA. Please R.S.V.P. 508-478-3509.
  • Tuesday, September 29, 2015 at 7:30 PM College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA with violinist Carol Lieberman and Vytas Baksys
  • Sunday, September 27, 2015 at 3:30 PM LiveArts Concert Series, Franklin, MA with Vytas Baksys
  • Sunday, September 20, 2015 at 7 PM Grace United Methodist Church, Venice with the principal strings of the Venice Symphony and Vytas Baksys
  • Saturday, September 19, 2015 at 7 PM Church of the Holy Spirit, Osprey, FL
  • Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 3:00 PM Friends of Artists Series, Sarasota with Vytas Baksys
  • Sunday, September 13, 2015 at 6:00 PM St. Boniface Church, Siesta Key with Vytas Baksys
  • Thursday,September 3, 2015 at 6:00 PM Chart House Restaurant Concert with Sean O'Neil and Luisa Bustamente
  • Friday, August 28, 2015 at 4:30 PM Sarasota Garden Club with Dean Anderson and Tihda Vonkoth

 

More praise for my CD "Invocation" - 

 
".....Linda Bento-Rei's newest recording, "Invocation", grabs the attention right away with its booklet's cover art: a woman's face elaborately painted in black, white, and red, at once primitive and sophisticated. The recording brings together some wonderfully diverse flute chamber works of 20th and 21st century composers. Lovers of classical music as well as jazz aficionados will find much to enjoy here. Perhaps the single most impressive aspect of the recording is the phenomenal sense of rhythm of Bento-Rei and her colleagues; they achieve a degree of musical symbiosis rarely heard.
 
 "Invocation" is an apt title for a program that invokes individual things--spring, youth, a recently deceased loved one, and Latin dance styles--but also diversity generally. Linda Bento-Rei, as central performer, demonstrates the enormous versatility that this demands. She and her excellent colleagues show most enjoyably that variety is the spice of life."
-Geoff Wieting, The Boston Musical Intelligencer
 
"........The most striking observation of this CD is the ensemble work, which is exemplary and flawless throughout. Special mention must be made of the extraordinary playing of pianist Vytas Baksys, which is accurately supportive in the Schickele and rhythmically authentic in the complex salsa underpinnings of the Mower.
 
This is an absolutely outstanding recording. The excellences one looks for in flute playing are here. Ms. Bento-Rei’s intonation is impeccable, as is her articulation. She performs passages of dazzling virtuosity, especially in the Schickele, in addition to other virtues which are beyond the expected. Her flute sound in strong passages is as rich and full as I’ve heard on that instrument, while in softer passages, especially in the Janacek, it has a beautiful delicacy. Her playing has, when necessary, a quite extraordinary authority, often of a degree which one more commonly finds in a lead trumpet. And none of this comes at a price: there are, to my ear, no moments of compromise, no places where, for example, emotion is sacrificed for mechanical precision, or sound for speed. The playing throughout has great integrity: all its virtues are in the service of a larger musicality."
 - Harry Schroeder, Music Critic, Solares Hill Newspaper, The Key West Citizen

 

COPYRIGHT NOTICE
 
The information on this site is the property of Linda M. Bento-Rei. No broadcasting or duplication of any music excerpts or photopraphs in public form are allowed.

St. Boniface Church, Siesta Ke

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Friday, April 25, 2014 at 7:30 PM - Duo concert with Vytas Baksys.

Program includes:

Sonata in G Minor, CPE Bach

Sonata Latino, Mike Mower

Sonata, Joseph Jongen

Spring Serenade, Peter Schickele

Danse Lente, Joseph Jongen

 

5615 Midnight Pass Rd, Sarasota, FL 34242
(941) 349-5616

Grammy Consideration

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Friday, October 24, 2014

'Jongen Project' in race for Grammy nod

By Richard Duckett TELEGRAM & GAZETTE STAFF

richard.duckett@telegram.com

"The Jongen Project — The Music of Joseph Jongen," a CD by Worcester flutist Linda Bento-Rei, has been submitted to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences for Grammy consideration. 


Votes are being cast this week for the semi-finalists who will be nominated for a Grammy Award. Joseph Jongen (1873-1953) was a Belgian a composer, organist and educator who, while well-regarded in his time, slipped into obscurity. Bento-Rei was inspired to make her recording after attending a performance of one his works.

"It was incredible, it was so intense," she recalled during an interview earlier this year. 

"The Jongen Project" consists of four of Jongen's chamber music compositions for flute and other instruments. 

Recording spanned over a year at the Fraser Performance Studio, WGBH, Boston, and involved 13 musicians. 

Contact Richard Duckett at Richard.Duckett@telegram.com 

 

 

 

Radio Air Play

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"The Jongen Project" Music of Joseph Jongen and "Invocation"can now be heard on WUSF Public Media Tampa, WSMR Sarasota and AMI Radio Anna Maria Island, Florida. Listen on WSMR 89.1 FM, 103.1 FM and 1700 AM

Netherlands Flute Society

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The Jongen Project. Music of Joseph Jongen (1873-1953). Linda Bento-Rei fluit. Concert à Cinq op. 71, Sonate pour flûte et piano op. 77, Rhapsodie voor fluit, hobo, klarinet, fagot, hoorn en piano op. 70, Danse Lente pour flûte et piano op. 56. Opname in beheer van het Worcester Symphony Orchestra 2013.

Deze Amerikaanse cd omvat werkelijk een ‘project’: alleen kamermuziekwerken met fluit van de Belgische componist Joseph Jongen. Jongen heeft van veel kanten invloeden ondergaan: Belgische, Duitse en Franse (Debussy en Ravel!), wat zijn muziek een geheel eigen karakter geeft. Zelfs Stravinsky en de ‘Six’ zijn te horen in sommige speelse gedeelten. De drie grote werken op de cd zijn ontstaan tussen 1922 en 1924, deDanse Lente in 1918 in Engeland, waar hij naartoe gevlucht was vanwege de Eerste Wereldoorlog. De uitvoering van deze toch wel gecompliceerde muziek is heel mooi, alle uitvoerenden zitten op één lijn met hun expressie en klankkleuren. De fluit is niet zozeer het solo-instrument, maar meer ‘one of the guys’, met een warme persoonlijke toon, die zich snel kan aanpassen aan de muzikale omgeving. Hoewel er iets voor te zeggen zou zijn om Joseph Jongen als een meer Frans-georiënteerde componist te beschouwen (de Sonate is opgedragen aan René Le Roy), laten deze Amerikanen horen dat ze zich historisch goed geïnformeerd hebben.

The Jongen Project. Music of Joseph Jongen (1873-1953). Linda Bento-Rei flute. Concert à Cinq op. 71, Sonate pour flûte et piano op. 77, Rhapsodie for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, French horn and piano op. 70, Danse Lente pour flûte et piano op. 56. Recording under the management of the Worcester Symphony Orchestra 2013.

This American cd is  really a project: only chamber music pieces including the flute, by the Belgian composer Joseph Jongen. Jongen was influenced a lot from many sides: Belgian, German and French (Debussy and Ravel!) which results in a music with a completely particular character. One can even hear Stravinsky and the ‘Six’ in some of the playful movements. The three main works on the cd date from 1922 to 1924, the Danse Lente from 1918 in England, to where he was escaped because of World War I. The performance of this rather complicated music is very beautiful. All performers are one with their expression and color of sound. The flute is more ‘one of the guys’ than a solo-instrument, with a warm personal tone which adepts to the musical environment. One could say that Joseph Jongen is a more French-orientated

Composer (the Sonate is dedicated to René Le Roy) but one can hear that these Americans are historically well informed. 

Sarasota Herald Tribune

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A soulful discovery for the flute

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Flutist Linda Bento-Rei clearly remembers the first time she encountered a composition by Belgian composer Joseph Jongen.

It was a small concert, with an audience of only about 100 people, and when Concert a Cinq, Op. 71, composed in 1923, was played, "everyone wept," said Bento-Rei. "I put it on my bucket list, and when my mother was dying, I decided I wanted to learn this piece and perform it."

She collaborated with Ann Hobson Pilot, the renowned principal harpist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (who has since retired and also lives in Sarasota), and with members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and they played the concerto "three times over the period of time my mother was leaving this planet. That was the beginning of the love affair."

As she began studying Jongen (1873-1953),who might be best known for his organ compositions, she found that he had composed several pieces for flute. In 2013, she released "The Jongen Project: Music of Joseph Jongen."

Flutist Linda Bento-Rei / COURTESY PHOTO

Flutist Linda Bento-Rei / COURTESY PHOTO

Sunday evening, she'll perform two Jongen works, Danse Lente op. 56b, and Sonata, in the second half of a concert she's giving, with BSO pianist Vytas J. Baksys, at St. Boniface Episcopal Church.

Bento-Rei moved with her husband to Osprey about a year ago from Massachusetts, where she had played "in all the little and not so little orchestras" after completing her studies at the Boston Conservatory of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music. In 2005 she and her husband, an attorney and real estate broker, became president and vice president of the Worcester Symphony Orchestra, which sponsored her two recordings (the second, "Invocation" will be released next month).

Their move to Southwest Florida came out of a desire to "begin a new life."

"We sold our home in Massachusetts that we spent 10 years renovating. That was a difficult decision," she said.

The cultural scene here proved irresistible.

"It's amazing how quickly we established ourselves," she said. "It's hard to uproot and re-establish as a musician."

She played a concert with the principal string players of the Venice Symphony and subsequently accepted the position of principal flute. 

Tonight's concert includes Mozart's Andante in C Major, K. 315; Ernest Bloch's Suite Modale; Francis Poulenc's Sonata; and the two Jongen works.

Danse lente was originally written for flute and harp, but translated for piano by Baksys.

"It's soulful and otherworldly music," she said. "It's kind of a portal to the other side. It's like nothing I've ever heard or played."

CONCERT PREVIEW

MUSIC FOR FLUTE AND PIANO
Linda Bento-Rei, flute, and Vytas Baksys, piano. 6 p.m. Sept. 13, St. Boniface Episcopal Church, 5615 Midnight Pass Road, Siesta Key. Free; freewill offering. 349-5616; www.bonifacechurch.org

CONCERT PREVIEW
MUSIC FOR FLUTE AND PIANO Linda Bento-Rei, flute, and Vytas Baksys, piano. 6 p.m. Sept. 13, St. Boniface Epicopal Church, 5615 Midnight Pass Road, Siesta Key. Free; freewill offering. 349-5616; www.bonifacechurch.org
avatar

SUSAN RIFE

Susan Rife is the arts and books editor for the Herald-Tribune Media Group. She holds a bachelor of science degree in journalism from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She can be reached by emailor call (941) 361-4930. Make sure to "Like" Arts Sarasota on Facebook for news and reviews of the arts.
Last modified: September 9, 2015

2015 Performances

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♦ Monday, March 9, 2015 at 2 PM, Venice, FL in collaboration with the Venice Symphony String Quartet

♦ Wednesday, March 11, 2015 at 2 PM, Players School of Music, Clearwater, FL - Concert and Master Class

♦ Suday, March 15, 2015 at 2 PM, Church of the Holy Spirit, Osprey, FL 

♦ Friday, March 27, 2015, 8 PM, Sarasota, FL

♦ Friday, April 10, 2015, 7:30 PM, First Congregational Church, 1031 Euclid Ave., Sarasota, Florida

♦ Friday, August 28, 2015 at 4:30 PM Sarasota Garden Club with Dean Anderson and Tihda Vonkoth

♦ Thursday,September 3, 2015 at 6:00 PM Chart House Restaurant Concert with Sean O'Neil and Luisa Bustamente

♦ Sunday, September 13, 2015 at 6:00 PM St. Boniface Church, Siesta Key with Vytas Baksys

♦ Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 3:00 PM Friends of Artists Series, Sarasota with Vytas Baksys

Rane Moore 

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Clarinetist Rane Moore enjoys an active performing schedule at home and abroad. An enthusiastic interpreter of contemporary repertoire, she is a member of the Talea Ensemble, Callithumpian Consort and Sound Icon. Ms. Moore has given numerous premieres of new works and appeared with Boston Musica Viva, Firebird Ensemble, Ludovico Ensemble, East Coast Contemporary Ensemble, Brave New Works, Guerilla Opera, Hyperion Ensemble, and the Bang on a Can All-Stars.  She is a frequent guest with Boston-based chamber music groups Raduis Ensemble and Vento Chiaro as well as Emmanuel Music, Boston Modern Orchestra Project and the Boston Ballet Orchestra. Ms. Moore has recordings available on Tzadik, Gravina Música, New World, Bridge, Navona, and Tzadik. Critics have praised her “enthralling,” “tour-de-force,” and “phenomenal” performances.

Gary Gorczyca

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Clarinetist Gary Gorczyca began his musical career on the heels of an education from New England Conservatory, Boston University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Shortly afterward he received fellowships to attend the Norfolk Chamber and Contemporary Music Festival as well as the Tanglewood Music Center, where he was awarded a Jackson Prize for outstanding musical achievement. Chamber music experience includes the Rockport Chamber Music Festival, North Country Chamber Players and Harvard's Fromm Players. For 10 years, Mr. Gorczyca was a first call substitute with the Boston Symphony under the baton of Seiji Ozawa, Bernard Haitink, Andre Previn and others, where he received solo bows both in Symphony and Carnegie Halls. Additionally, he has been a soloist with the Angelica International Festival and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project. He currently spends his time performing, repairing wind instruments, teaching privately, and with family.
 
 
 

Fernando Huergo

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Fernando Huergo was born in Cordoba, Argentina in 1968. Has recorded over 130 albums, including 10 as a leader. Fernando has toured and given clinics in North, Central and South America, Europe and Asia. He is currently performing with the bands of Guillermo Klein and Los Guachos, Marta Gomez, Matthias Bublath, Mozik and has performed in the bands of Danilo Perez, Luciana Souza, Cesar Camargo Mariano Trio, Dave Valentín, Hendrick Meurkens, Dave Liebman, Dave Samuels, Joe Beck and many others. He studied with Charlie Banacos, Jerry Bergonzi, Cecil McBee, and George Rusell among others. Fernando graduated from Berklee College of Music in 1992, where he is a faculty member in the Bass Department since 1996, with the position of Professor. He also teaches at Tufts University since 2001 and at MIT since 2006. Fernando received a Grant from Chamber Music of America and the French American Cultural Exchange in 2010.

 

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Fernando Huergo was born in Cordoba, Argentina in 1968.

Has recorded over 130 albums, including 10 as a leader.

Fernando has toured and given clinics in North, Central and South America, Europe and

Asia.

He is currently performing with the bands of Guillermo Klein and Los Guachos, Marta

Gomez, Matthias Bublath, Mozik and has performed in the bands of Danilo Perez,

Luciana Souza, Cesar Camargo Mariano Trio, Dave Valentín, Hendrick Meurkens, Dave

Liebman, Dave Samuels, Joe Beck and many others.

He studied with Charlie Banacos, Jerry Bergonzi, Cecil McBee, and George Rusell

among others.

Fernando graduated from Berklee College of Music in 1992, where he is a faculty

member in the Bass Department since 1996, with the position of Professor. He also

teaches at Tufts University since 2001 and at MIT since 2006.

Fernando received a Grant from Chamber Music of America and the French American

Cultural Exchange in 2010.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Ricardo Monzon

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An alumnus of Berklee College of Music, Ricardo now teaches in the Percussion and Ensemble departments there.  He is an accomplished drummer, percussionist, and studio musician who has toured and performed with the Boston Pops Orchestra. Performed for the “Chris Botti in Boston concert/video and CD” with Sting, Chris Botti, John Meyer, Josh Groban and Yo Yo Ma. Performances with George Duke, Abe Laboriel, Aretha Franklin, Mario Frangoulis, Tata Vega, Donna Summer, The New York Voices, Stanley Clark, Lenny White, Mary Wilson of the Supremes, Dan Moretti, the Epic Brass Quintet, Deborah Henson-Conant, Myanna, Bernard Purdie, the Greg Hopkins Big Band, and the Orquesta Sinfonica de Guatemala.  He has shared the stage with Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez, Giovanni Hidalgo, Dave Samuels, Terry Lynne Carrington and Lincoln Goines. 

A highly sought-after studio musician as well, Ricardo has recorded with Grammy nominated “Latin Album” with the Boston Pops, The JCA Orchestra, New World Jazz Octet, Walter Beasley, including “Ready for love which reached #2 Billboard Contemporary Jazz chart, and #1 on Smooth Jazz.com. Larry Watson, Darrell Nulisch, Geoff Bartley, and was featured with Dan Moretti's band on Jazz Player magazine's play-along contemporary jazz CD.  He recorded percussion tracks for the film Squeeze, the Mary Tyler Moore HBO special, Montages on Copan, Mayan Passages by John Moore, and other documentary films. Featured on the Thaddeus Hogarth video “ LIVE AT BOSSE”, leader of his own Jazz Quartet, Marimba Canto De Guatemala, The Ricardo Monzón Orchestra, Jazz for kids and Orquesta Bacharengue.  

Ricardo is the creator of the concert series: THE MARIMBA MUSIC OF GUATEMALA, at Berklee College of Music, and the author of BASIC AFRO-CUBAN RHYTHMS FOR PERCUSSION AND DRUM SET, an instructional DVD published by Berklee Press. 

Related Links

Berklee Press title(s): Basic Afro-Cuban Rhythms with Ricardo Monzon  (DVD)

Mikael Ringquist

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Mikael Ringquist received his B.M. from Berklee College of Music. He has had extensive international performances. He currently performs with the Calypso Hurricane. He has numerous recording credits. He is a hand percussion coordinator and a private instructor on Latin and Brazilian percussion.

Marcus Santos

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Bahia, Brazil native, Marcus Santos is a contemporary percussionist and educator. He commits his life to the study, teaching and performance of his hometown's Afro-Brazilian music and heritage.

Marcus has performed for the President of Brazil, and on TEDx, Telemundo with the “One World Band” produced by MTV. He also played on Sony Pictures, Oscar-nominated movie, ‘Rachel's Getting Married’ with Anne Hathaway. He has received several industry honors including the KoSARecognition Award (2013), Outstanding Arts Performer Award by the Brazilian Immigrant Center (2008) and Outstanding Percussionist Award byBerklee College of Music (2004). 

Marcus is the author of the DVD ‘
Modern Approach to Pandeiro’. He also performed on the DVD ‘Musically Speaking II’ by BOSE. In the education field, Marcus has lead workshops on Afro-Brazilian percussion and music for social change at notable universities and conventions including Carnegie Hall, PASIC and Harvard. 

Marcus the director of the network project, Grooversity, and artistically directs fifteen drumming groups throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Bob Tamagni

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Bob Tamagni is a Professor in the Percussion Department at Berklee College of Music, Boston, MA. He has been a jazz performer, recording artist, and educator for over 40 years. Bob has recorded with many local and international artists, including Mike and Pat Metheny, Gary Burton, Greg Hopkins, Livingston Taylor, Giovanni Moltoni, Bob Nieske’s Big Wolf Project and Boston Jazz Orchestra. He also performed in local and international concerts and jazz festival performances with The Berklee All Stars, Ben Powell, The Sled Dogs, Makoto Ozone, Gary Burton and Ed Saindon.

He has performed as the drummer in the house trio at one of Boston’s premier jazz venues, The Top of the Hub for the past fifteen years. He has also given numerous national and international drum set clinics worldwide, including in Greece, Japan, Poland, Bulgaria, Germany, Italy, Ecuador, and the U.S.

The Jongen Project

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CD Review by Geoff Wieting, Boston Music Intelligencer

It is a conundrum of classical music that certain composers of indisputable talent, whose posthumous fame should be assured, can nonetheless be forgotten owing to changing fashions. The most famous example, of course, is the greatest of composers, Johann Sebastian Bach himself. Though Bach and some others (e.g., Charles-Valentin Alkan) have enjoyed rediscovery, still others are not yet so fortunate. With the sole exception of his organ music, the Belgian composer Joseph Jongen (1873-1953) falls into the latter category. The Jongen Project, a group of accomplished instrumentalists headed by flutist Linda Bento-Rei, has taken an important step in correcting this injustice by recording an all-Jongen CD which includes four beautiful chamber works. Conservative for their time, the Belgian's works are very “audience-friendly,” showing the influence of his countryman, César Franck, and, especially, Claude Debussy, though Jongen's musical language is consistently distinctive. 

Written in 1923, the Concert à cinq, Op. 71, is scored for harp, flute, and string trio, and shows the unmistakable influence of French impressionism. Though they are largely orchestral musicians, the players demonstrate outstanding chamber music skills. In addition to Bento-Rei, violinist Jason Horowitz, violist Rebecca Gitter, cellist Blaise Déjardin (all current members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's string section), and retired BSO principal harpist Ann Hobson Pilot all collaborate and interact with the flexibility, grace, and seamlessness of a seasoned ensemble. The largely extroverted first movement, played persuasively here, contrasts starkly with the second. Placed at the center of the larger work, the second movement's penitential tune, modal and bittersweet, is one of Jongen's exceptional creations, and the artists play it affectingly. The third and final movement's Spanish flavor and luscious harmonic vocabulary are also hallmarks of the French impressionists, but in the unexpected final bare-octaves chord where Debussy and Ravel would likely have signed off with harmony, Jongen stakes out his own territory. Yet amidst all the preceding gorgeous colors of the movement, the players' insistent rhythm, like castanets, pulls the listener along irresistibly. This enchanting work would make a fine program companion for Debussy's Sonata for flute, viola, and harp, Ravel's Introduction et Allegro, and André Jolivet's Chant de Linos—the last, in its later version, scored for Jongen's exact instrumentation.

 The four-movement, 30-minute Sonata for flute and piano, Op. 77, is a major rediscovery for the flute repertoire. Though its Gallic provenance is evident, it yet retains a savor unique to Jongen. Linda Bento-Rei and pianist Vytas Baksys are expert tour guides through the many landscapes of the first movement: powerfully dramatic, playful, singing, and mysterious. The second movement is a brilliant scherzo-étude with delicious staccato passages offset by silky legato themes; in these performers' highly capable hands it is a thrilling and delicious experience. The third movement would seem to be Jongen's tip of the hat to both Ravel and Debussy. The outer sections are spare in texture—very much in Ravel's late style dépouillé (stripped-down); the central section bears more than a passing resemblance to Debussy's piano prelude The Sunken Cathedral, based on a Breton legend of a submerged cathedral that rises out of the sea once a year only to sink below the waves again. To the swirling waters and iridescent colors Baksys summons up, Bento-Rei adds flute interjections evoking seabirds soaring around the great edifice. After these sumptuous harmonies, the return to the simplicity of the movement's opening is genuinely moving. The final movement is an exhilarating jig which also regularly superimposes lyrical writing for both instruments over the compelling dance rhythm. The players' ability to conjure multiple moods is as impressive as their technical virtuosity. One hopes that many talented flutists and flute teachers will hear this fine performance and seek out this neglected masterwork.

 Jongen's Rhapsodie, Op. 70 is scored for the unusual combination of piano with woodwind quintet—Vytas Baksys, piano; Linda Bento-Rei, flute; Andrea Bonsignore, oboe; Catherine Hudgins, clarinet; Patricia Yee, bassoon; and Nick Rubenstein, horn. As its name implies, the work is a loosely structured series of varying moods and tempi. The Modéré opening section introduces the individual wind instruments sequentially, punctuated by arpeggios from flute and piano in lush French impressionist style. This is followed by a sharply contrasting Moorish habanera (if such a thing were possible) whose characteristic rhythm is supplied by the piano, with a changing instrumentation playing the theme over it. The players' subtle rubatono doubt difficult to achieve without a conductor—makes this section smoky and seductive. A third section, Molto vivo, brings us vigorously back into bright sunshine while ingeniously weaving in echoes from the two previous sections. A more moderate passage is left initially to the wind instruments only, becoming still more relaxed and lyrical when the piano reënters. Nonetheless, it builds up before long to the powerful triple-meter final section, full of jubilation. Soon enough, in keeping with the freedom of a rhapsody, the energy begins to taper off as the music seems about to drift into slumber. One last time the composer skillfully reintroduces material from the work's opening section, as if in the vague recollection of a dream, before the surprise of a final outburst of joy. Baksys, Bento-Rei, Bonsignore, Hudgins, Yee, and Rubenstein have the sound of an experienced chamber group: each individual gracefully takes and yields the spotlight as appropriate, and as a group, their intonation, balances, and ensemble are all one could wish for. This is another vividly evocative rendition and one that should arouse the interest of wind ensembles (with access to an excellent pianist!) hoping to enlarge their repertoire.

 The Danse lente, Op. 56, stands somewhat apart from its discmates, not merely for its date of composition—1918 vs. 1922-1924—but also for its simplicity and general feeling of introspection. The composer created a version for flute and harp, and another, only slightly modified, for flute and piano. Bento-Rei and Baksys give us the latter in a simple, direct reading that is the more moving for its avoidance of “interpretation.” Given the work's date, one might expect a dirge for war-torn Europe, but aside from one expansive climax, the prevailing mood is of a bittersweet, gentle yearning. (It is worth noting that the piece was written in London, where Jongen lived in exile during World War I.) The final harmony is particularly evocative of unfulfilled desire for resolution: the piano forms a minor seventh chord while the flute adds the ninth to it, but neither seventh nor ninth resolves as expected to the tonic chord, as if the composer were telling us that sometimes we simply have to learn to live without what we yearn for.

 In my view, this recording is a resounding success on all counts. Its performances are passionately committed and beautiful; the selection of repertoire enables the listener to hear Joseph Jongen's musical influences but also the aspects of his music that make it uniquely his; the excellent program notes by Steven Ledbetter are helpful to connoisseur and layperson alike; and the sensitive engineering of Antonio Oliart has resulted in exemplary sound quality, both sumptuous and transparent, detailed and atmospheric. I hope this is Volume 1 in a series exploring the chamber music of this composer so unjustly neglected. 

-Geoff Wieting, The Boston Music Intelligencer

Invocation

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CD Review by Geoff Wieting, Boston Music Intelligencer

Linda Bento-Rei's newest recording, "Invocation", grabs the attention right away with its booklet's cover art: a woman's face elaborately painted in black, white, and red, at once primitive and sophisticated. The recording brings together some wonderfully diverse flute chamber works of 20th and 21st century composers. Lovers of classical music as well as jazz aficionados will find much to enjoy here. Perhaps the single most impressive aspect of the recording is the phenomenal sense of rhythm of Bento-Rei and her colleagues; they achieve a degree of musical symbiosis rarely heard. 

The fresh opening is the Spring Serenade for flute and piano by Peter Schickele (b. 1935), who might be called a victim of his own success. His "discovered composer" P. D. Q. Bach has been such a popular parody of Baroque- and Classical-period music that relatively few listeners are aware of Schickele's serious compositions. Bento-Rei and pianist Vytas Baksys create a bewitching atmosphere in the Serenade's first movement, Invocation, the flute beginning rhythmically independent of the piano and in the distance (offstage in a live performance), but gradually approaching and ultimately coordinating phrases. With its unpredictable rhythmic twists and turns, the brief Pastorale evokes a pair of youngsters playing catch-me-if-you-can. The scherzo, aptly named Whirlwind Waltz, features breathless chains of triplets but also alternating "trio sections" of a lovely melancholy. The performers' synergy is impressive through the many irregular rhythms and changes of tempo. The slow movement, Song, is notable for its spare textures: Baksys opens alone with two voices moving in contrary motion, Bento-Rei joins with a simple but haunting tune, and finally we return to the two voices again but with the flute supplying one of them this time, without vibrato. The virtuoso Finale is (to use a retro phrase) a gas, mostly jazz, featuring long runs--flute and piano in octaves--that double back on themselves, boogie-woogie piano left-hand, more reflective sections, and bluesy figures tossed back and forth antiphonally. Bento-Rei and Baksys have themselves a grand time, and their immaculate ensemble is truly astounding.

 

In Mládí ("Youth"), by Leoš Janácek (1854-1928), Bento-Rei is an equal partner (perhaps "first among equals") with five other accomplished wind players: Andrea Bonsignore, oboe; Rane Moore, clarinet; Nicholas Rubenstein, horn; Patricia Yee, bassoon; and Gary Gorczyca, bass clarinet. The players vividly capture Janácek's portrait in the first movement of  the unrest and confusion of his adolescence but also the excitement of the possibilities appearing before him. The second movement, Andante sostenuto, immediately catches the ear with its unusual combination of bassoon and bass clarinet playing in unison. Though the preponderance of the movement is introspective, it rises to several climaxes; through wide-ranging changes of tempo, dynamics and mood, the musicians' ensemble and balance is exemplary. In the mischievous scherzo, Bento-Rei exchanges her flute for a mischievous piccolo, though as in the preceding Schickele work, interspersed are multiple, more contemplative "trio sections", in which Bonsignore, Bento-Rei, and Rubenstein offer handsome solos. The final movement is largely an elaboration of the material of the first, patterned on the speech rhythms in the Moravian tongue of "youth, golden youth", adding perhaps a bit more technical brilliance. Again, in music with a plethora of moods, tempi, and dynamics, these six players achieve wizardry without a conductor.

 

The Chant de Linos of André Jolivet (1905-1974) was first written for flute and piano as a competition piece for the Paris Conservatoire but is perhaps better known in Jolivet's transcription for flute, harp, and string trio. It is this rather more colorful version performed here by Bento-Rei; Ann Hobson-Pilot, harp; Miguel Pérez-Espejo, violin; Nathaniel Farny, viola; and Michael Curry, cello. There are a number of conflicting Greek myths concerning Linus, but most accepted that he was a musician of outstanding talent; in some accounts he is the son of Apollo, the god of music, by a mortal woman. The term ailinon meant a harvest song lamenting the "death of the year" but was possibly derived from ai Linon ("alas for Linus") since, in many of the stories, Linus died young. The Chant follows this tradition of funeral lament in the Mediterranean cathartic manner, including wild cries of lamentation and even dancing. One might say it is the musical equivalent of the CD's cover art: sophisticated and primitive at the same time. The work makes extravagant demands on the flutist, but Bento-Rei takes it in stride, using the technical display for musical purposes. These superb instrumentalists take the listener on an exotic and emotional journey, with grief rising to a climax, falling back for a time, then rising to another peak, subsiding again, and so on. Very free cadenzas alternate with strict dance rhythms, and as before, the players' flawless ensemble impresses mightily.

 

While Chant de Linos ends brightly, its overall emotional intensity is undeniable. It was a wise choice to end the program with a light, airy, even fun piece: Sonata Latino by Mike Mower (b. 1958). The genre of classical-jazz fusion for flute, piano, et al., goes back at least as far as the 1970s with Claude Bolling's pieces for Jean-Pierre Rampal, and Mower's contribution is of comparable quality--with a Latin accent. Sonata Latino exists in several instrumental configurations; "Invocation" gives us a medium version with Bento-Rei; Vytas Baksys, piano; Fernando Huergo, bass; Robert Tamagni, drum-set; and Ricardo Monzon, Mikael Ringquist, and Marcus Santos, Latin percussion. Bento-Rei and Baksys convey Latin flavor authoritatively, undoubtedly assisted by Latin percussionists. Each of the work's three movements incorporates the musical style of a different country. The opening Salsa montunate, using Cuban salsa and son montunato (mountain song), has irrepressible energy and the spontaneity of a jazz improvisation--until we hear both flute and piano play the same brilliant and complex runs in octaves and are reminded this is a through-composed piece. The second movement, Rumbango, mixing Argentine tango and Colombian rumba rhythms, begins with a flute solo, soon joined by the piano; with their colorful playing Bento-Rei and Baksys facilitate fantasy. Thereafter, Baksys initiates the strict but sensuous beat of the tango, and soon Bento-Rei joins, adding melodic interest and flourishes. A brief, lyrical central section brings back the percussion instruments and is characterized by delicious syncopations and harmonies. With the return of the tango, flute and piano build to a climax where Baksys supplies percussion with fortissimo tone clusters at the bottom of the keyboard; a sly pianissimo tag supplies the final cadence. The regular percussionists and bass return in the final movement, Bossa merengova, which incorporates the Brazilian bossa nova as well as the merengue of Venezuela and Colombia. Despite its complex, continually syncopated rhythms, this brilliant and energetic performance always feels like an "invitation to the dance".

 

 

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"Invocation" is an apt title for a program that invokes individual things--spring, youth, a recently deceased loved one, and Latin dance styles--but also diversity generally. Linda Bento-Rei, as central performer, demonstrates the enormous versatility that this demands. She and her excellent colleagues show most enjoyably that variety is the spice of life.

Key West Citizen

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Performance Resume

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Education

  • New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, MA - Master of Flute Performance, Merit Scholarship
  • Boston Conservatory of Music, Boston, MA - Bachelor of Flute Performance, cum laude

 Orchestral Experience

 

  • Venice Symphony, Principal Flute, 2015/2016, 2016/2017
  • Fifth Avenue Chamber Orchestra, Naples, FL - Second Flute, 2016 to Present
  • Newport Contemporary Music Festival, 2017
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  • Gulfshore Opera, Naples, FL - Principal Flute, 2016
  • Opera Worcester “Carmen”, Worcester, MA - Principal Flute, 2013
  • Portland Symphony Orchestra, Portland, ME –  (sub.) Principal, Second, Piccolo, 1986 to Present
  • Key West Symphony Orchestra, Key West, FL -  (sub.) Principal, second, Piccolo, 2006 to 2008
  • Lexington Symphony Orchestra, Lexington, MA - (sub.) Second, 2004 to 2006
  • Rhode Island Philharmonic, Providence, RI -  (sub.) Second, Piccolo, 1990 to Present
  • New Hampshire Symphony Orchestra, Nashua, NH -  Piccolo 2004
  • Festival Ballet Orchestra, Providence, RI - Second, Piccolo 1996 to 1998
  • Vermont Symphony Orchestra, Burlington, VT -  Piccolo (sub.) 1997
  • Milford Symphony Orchestra, Milford, MA - Principal Flute 1985-1995 - Soloist, Mozart Concerto in G Major, Howard Hansen, Serenade

 Chamber Music Experience

  • Artistic Director/Co-Founder/Performer, Sarasota Musica Viva, 2014 to Present. www.sarasotamusicaviva.org
  • 2015/2016 Season – Duo and chamber music concerts with Ann Hobson-Pilot, retired principal harpist with the Boston Symphony at Pine Shores Presbyterian Church, Sarasota, FL & Grace Methodist, Venice, FL
  • 2014/2015 Season - Duo concerts with Boston Symphony pianist, Vytas Baksys at LiveArts Concert, Franklin, MA; Brooks Hall, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA; Wellesley Free Library, Wellesley, MA; St. Boniface Church, Siesta Key, FL; David Cohen Hall, Sarasota, FL; Grace Methodist, Venice, FL; Church of the Holy Spirit, Osprey, FL
  • 2014/2015 Season – Chamber Music concerts with the Venice Symphony String Quartet at Grace Methodist, Venice, FL; Church of the Holy Spirit, Sarasota, FL; Chart House, Longboat Key, FL
  • 2013/2014 Season - “The Jongen Project” CD Release Concert (acclaimed review) at Brown Hall, New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, MA. Duo concert with Vytas Baksys at Rivera Recital Hall, The Rivers School, Weston, MA. Chamber Music concert with Ann Pilot and Carol Lieberman at Brooks Hall, College of the Holy Cross.
  • 2012-2013 Season - Performances with Boston Symphony Concert Master Malcolm Lowe, principal violist  Steve Ansell, cellist Michael Curry, Ann Hobson-Pilot at Razzo Hall, Clark University, Worcester, MA & Worcester Soiree Society private concert.
  • 1995-2014 - Arlington Street Chamber Players, Boston, MA - Woodwind Quintet concerts throughout New England

 Recording Artist

  • “The Jongen Project”, The Music of Joseph Jongen, Chamber Music Recording Project with members of the Boston Symphony. Released January, 2014 available at Amazon.com
  • “Invocation”, Schickele, Janacek, Mower, Jolivet Chamber Music Recording Project with members of the Boston Symphony. Released October, 2015 available at Amazon.com

Board of Director Member

  • President, Board of Directors, Sarasota Musica Viva, Osprey, FL - 2014 to Present
  • President, Board of Directors, Worcester Chamber Players, Worcester, MA - 2005-2014
  • Board of Directors, La Musica International Music Festival, Sarasota, FL - 2015-2017
  • Member, Musician's Committee, The Venice Symphony Orchestra, Venice, FL 2017 to Present

 

Master Classes

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Festive Holiday Concert 12/5/16 at 7:00 PM

First Congregational Church of Christ, 1031 S. Euclid Ave., Sarasota, FL 34237

Program

 

Hamburger Sonata in G Major                                             Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach

Yizkor And Anima Aeterna                                                                          Robert Starer

Duet, No.4                                                                               Wilhelm Friedemann Bach

Dialogo Angelico                                                                                   Goffredo Petrassi

Elegia Y Joropo                                                                                               Nicolas Real

Trio Sonata in G                                                                           Johann Sebastian Bach   

Linda Bento-Rei & Betsy Hudson-Traba, flutes

 

Ann Alton, cello

 

Mark Kroll, harpsichord

Festive Holiday Concert

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Call 941-870-9885 for more information.

Sarasota Musica Viva

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Sarasota Musica Viva

www.sarasotamusicaviva.org

 

 

4/9/17 ART AVENUE

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Soirees!

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Musical Soirees are the perfect reason to gather people! 

Available in your home or in ours, or at a special venue!

"Noel"

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 "I just got your CD and listened to it. I like it a lot—it really is excellent. Your playing is appropriate to what you’re doing—sometimes jaunty, sometimes tender, very eloquent, and always musical. One quality I particularly like is the width of the vibrato, which is just right—always expressive, never sentimental. And you really do have one of the finest flute sounds anywhere. Vytas, as always, is terrific: relaxed but precise in touch and time, generous in feeling, and the two of you play together marvelously." - Harry Schroeder

Noel

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Review By Geoff Wieting, Boston Music Intelligencer

 

The Venice Symphony

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Linda Bento-Rei, Principal Flute Since 2016

CONCERT SCHEDULE

 

November 17, 2017 at 7:30 pm and Nov. 18, 2017 at 3:30 pm:
Majestic Moments: Conductor: Teresa Cheung
Our season begins with crowning examples of the Romantic Era including Weberʼs Overture to Oberon, Tchaikovsky’s epic Symphony No. 5 in e minor, Op. 64 and Dvorakʼs Cello Concerto in b minor, Op. 104.

Guest Soloist Jonathan Swensen astarted playing cello at age 7 and has already won numerous competitions in Denmark and Sweden; the Öresunds Competition 2011, Berlingskes Classical Music competition 2012, “Play For Life” competition, where, in the last round, he played the Lalo cello concerto with the Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, … 

 

 

 

December 15, 2017 at 7:30 pm and December 16, 2017 at 3:30 and 7:30 pm
Holiday Pops: Conductor: Wesley Schulz
Celebrate the season with traditional & modern selections from Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, Richmanʼs Hanukkah Festival Overture, Phillipsʼ Christmas Eve/Sarajevo, Berlinʼs White Christmas, Williamsʼ Sound the Bells!, our popular sing-a-long & more. Guest artists are Soprano Soloist Johanna Fincher and Actor/Singer Eric Watters. 

 

 

 

January 12, 2018 at 7:30 pm and January 13, 2018 at 3:30 pm
Emotional Landscapes: ConductorStilian Kirov
Imagine vivid images of winter in Tchaikovskyʼs Snow Maiden Suite. Hear and feel the waves in Debussyʼs lilting La Mer. Soprano soloist D’Ana Lombardo performs Richard Straussʼs haunting musical epitaph, Four Last Songs.

 

 

 

 

February 16, 2018 at 7:30 pm and February 17, 2018 at 3:30 pm
Beethoven to Broadway: Conductor: Steven Jarvi
The eclectic mix of classic and contemporary composers will entertain and inspire you, featuring Beethovenʼs Symphony No. 6, Berloizʼs Roman Carnival Overture, Aaron Coplandʼs Saturday Night Waltz from Rodeo, and show-stoppers from The Sound of Music and West Side Story. Seating for this concert is VERY LIMITED. 

 

 

 

March 16, 2018 at 7:30 pm and March 17, 2018 at 3:30 pm
A Symphonic Journey: Conductor: Janna Hymes
Experience these timeless and melodic selections including Die Fledermaus Overture from the operetta by Johann Strauss, Dvorakʼs iconic and influential New World Symphony, and Samuel Barberʼs Violin Concerto featuring recording artist and violin soloist, Irina Muresanu.

Guest Soloist, Irina Muresano: Romanian violinist Irina Muresanu has won the hearts of audiences and critics alike with her “irresistible,” (Boston Globe) exciting, elegant and heartfelt performances of the classic, romantic and modern repertoire. The Globe has also come to praise her as “not just a virtuoso, but an artist” … 

 

 

 

April 13, 2018 at 7:30 pm and April 14, 2018 at 3:30 pm
Taking Flight: Conductor: Silas N. Huff
Soar with Stravinskyʼs magnificent Firebird Suite and Korngoldʼs rousing The Sea Hawk Overture. Renowned piano soloist Orion Weiss takes command of Brahmsʼ Piano Concerto No. 2 in B Flat Major and Bizetʼs crowd-pleasing Carmen Suite No.1 rounds out this program.

Guest Soloist: Pianist Orion Weiss: One of the most sought-after soloists in his generation of young American musicians, the pianist Orion Weiss has performed with the major American orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony, Boston Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and New York Philharmonic. …. 

 

 

 

May 4, 2018 at 7:30 pm and May 5, 2018 at 3:30 pm
A Tribute to Music in Cinema: Conductor: Troy Quinn
We will end our Finding Maestro! Season in spectacular fashion as acclaimed violin soloist and former concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, Glenn Dicterow, performs John Williamsʼ themes from Far and Away and Schindlerʼs List. The program also features classics from Oscar-winners Henry Mancini, Jerry Goldsmith and Ennio Morricone.

Guest Soloist: Violinist, Glenn Dicterow has established himself worldwide as one of the most prominent American concert artists of his generation. Mr. Dicterow has enjoyed a storied career. The concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic for 34 years, an all-time record in that major orchestral position, he became the first holder of the Robert Mann Chair in Strings and Chamber Music at the USC Thornton School of Music in 2013. He is also the Chairman of the Orchestral Performance Program at New York’s Manhattan School of Music …. 

 A "Jongen Project" Musician

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BSO taps one of its own as next principal cellist

Blaise Déjardin succeeds the late Jules Eskin as principal cellist.
MARCO BORGGREVE
Blaise Déjardin succeeds the late Jules Eskin as principal cellist.

The French cellist Blaise Déjardin, currently a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s cello section, has been named its next principal cellist. Déjardin, 33, becomes the 14th cellist to hold this principal position in the orchestra’s history. He succeeds cello legend Jules Eskin, who held the position for 52 years until his death in 2016. 

“It’s a huge honor, to get the job period, and to succeed Jules Eskin,” Déjardin told the Globe by phone on Monday. “For me, the most overwhelming thing about winning the job was not just that the committee chose me as a musician, but that they know me personally, and that I was respected enough by my peers. That personal aspect meant a lot to me.”  

A native of Strasbourg, Déjardin joined the BSO in 2008. Prior to that, he was a member of the European Union Youth Orchestra and the Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester as well as a founding member of the Boston-based conductorless chamber orchestra A Far Cry. In 2010, along with three other BSO section players, he cofounded the Boston Cello Quartet

Contact

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